The Oregon Wildland/Urban Human Fire Interface

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How Fire Works

Wildlife-Wildfire Interface

Oregon's Vulnerability

Biscuit Fire

Urban-Wildfire Interface

Firefighting Techniques

Sources

GEOGRAPHY 361 HOMEPAGE

 

 

Abstract

HAMILTON, Jr., W. J.,  hamiltwj@uwec.edu 
HAUG, R. C.,  haugrc@uwec.edu
KRUPICH, M. D.,  krupicmd@uwec.edu
PATTERSON, K. M.,  pattersk@uwec.edu
PETRASKO, K. L.,  petrakskl@uwec.edu
 

  In the last half century Oregon has experienced a sharp increase in lethal wild fires.  This can be attributed to the modification of the natural environment through human interaction and fire prevention techniques.  With the increase in lethal wild fires, citizens living in highly fire prone areas have legitimate concern for the management and prevention practices of this natural hazard.  This report will examine different components of forest fires affecting the Oregon region.  An overview of how fire works and travels and a discussion of why the Northwest is prone to forest fires will set the stage for further analysis of wild fire in this region. The regional ecosystems of Oregon and the impact of human involvement and non-involvement plays an integral role in the human relationship with fires.  Research will be done on how humans manage fires, and how the ‘control’ of fires is necessary for a populated infrastructure.  Adequate preparation for city planners, business, and home owners is essential to lower the chances of property loss and livelihood.