A-Z List


Anxiety & Stress Management

Journal Articles

Behavioral Status Motor Skills
Breathing Techniques Music Composition
Children New Age Music
Cognitive Performance
Community Personal
Coping Techniques Physical Status
Dance Physiological Status
Employers Psychological Status
Emotional Status Relaxation
Exercise Research
Geriatrics Social Skills
Humor Techniques Spiritual Status
Imagery Students
Listening Treatment
Meditation

Behavioral Status

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Justice, R. W. "Music Therapy Interventions for People with Eating Disorders in an Inpatient Setting." Music Therapy Perspectives 12(2) (1994): 104-110.
(Current) shelved by title.

This journal article spoke of the psychological and physical aspects of anorexia nervosa and bulemia. It also discussed interventions and goals in relaxation techniques involving music, structured music therapy session techniques, and "insight-oriented music and imagery techniques." Music therapy in this area helps the patient take control, learn new coping skills for anxiety and stress, and develop expressions of emotion and about themselves.

Michel, Donald E., Ph.D. Music Therapy: An Introduction to Therapy and Special Education Through Music. Springfield, Illinois Charles C Thomas, 1976.
Call number: ML 3920.M48.

The purpose of this book is to describe music therapy and music in special education. It explains how music therapy works with different kinds of patients and contexts. It also describes therapeutic goals and methodology for dealing with and treating several disorders, such as anxiety disorders. The book ends with a discussion of music therapy education and the training that is required in this field.

Stratton, V. N. Ph.D. and Annette H. Salanowski, M.A. "The Relationship Between Characteristic Moods and most Commonly Listened to Types of Music." Journal of Music Therapy
34(2) (1997): 129-140.
(Current) shelved by title.

This journal article is of great merit to music therapy. The researchers surveyed three samples of participants to find out their typical moods and the type of music that they usually listen to. Through doing this research they found out what types of music tended to induce anxiety, depression, and hostility, and what groups of people were affected this way. The main finding in their research was that negative moods are more likely to lead to music listening than for listening to music to induce their negative moods.

The Effects of Music Therapy on Anxiety in Chronically Ill Patients
Jodi-Levine Gross and Roberts Swartz
UWEC McIntyre Library
Music Therapy Journal Vol 2 no.1, 1982 p.43-51

This article explains the areas of high anxiety levels in elderly and chronically ill adults. It explains music¹s effects on various types of anxiety disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine whether participation in music therapy would produce changes in the ³trait² and ³state² anxiety of chronically ill hospitalized patients. The results showed that listening to happy, stimulating music elicited higher levels of anxiety than sad, sedate music and was less likely to reduce ³ state² anxiety. It also showed that exciting music produced more aggression as well as higher levels of anxiety than calm and no music situations.

Music Therapy and Stress Reduction Research
Suzanne B. Hanser
UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Journal of Music Therapy, XXII (4), 1985, 193-206

This article recognizes the effects of anxiety and stress on human behavior. This paper attempts to define anxiety, also referred to as stress and tension, and presents two models for coping with it. The role of music in palliative and instrumental modes of coping is explored. A review of music therapy and stress
reduction identifies problems in methodology and in the operational definitions of ³relaxing² or ³sedative² music. Different techniques for measuring relaxation are discussed.

Reciprocal Inhibition in Music Therapy: A Case Study Involving Wind Instrument Usage to Attenuate Fear, Anxiety, and Avoidance Reactivity in a Child with Pervasive Development Disorder
Paul D. Hoelzley
UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Music Therapy Journal 1991, Vol.10, No.1, 58-76

This article describes how wind instruments were used to reciprocally inhibit the strong fear, anxiety, and avoidance behavior of a 6- year-old girl with pervasive development disorder. Within the context of music therapy intervention, it was hypothesized that if fear-provoking stimuli ( i.e. the wind instruments as
feared objects) occurred simultaneously with fear-inhibiting stimuli ( i.e., the sounds of the wind instruments) the tie linking the instruments to the fear could be weakened or eliminated. This article explains the course of therapy with this child with PDD and the music therapist. During the course of music therapy the client showed considerable improvement in fine motor skills, attention span, and
levels of compliance and frustration tolerance. The article provides background information on PDD, explains the case history, and descibes music therapy assessment.

Comparisons of Cognitive, Music, and Imagery Techniques on Anxiety Reduction with University Students
Lori A. Russell
UWEC-McIntyre Library - Bound Journals
Journal of College Student Development V.33 Jan- Nov. 1992

This article explains the effectiveness of imagery, music, and cognitive therapeutic techniques in the reduction of anxiety. Two questions were asked when they did this study: (1) ³ Which techniques (imagery, music, and a cognitive intervention) were the most effective in lowering anxiety as compared to a control group and to each other?² (2) ³ What were the effects of imagery, music, and a cognitive intervention on the different types of anxiety ( state and trait)?²

The Music Therapy Source Book
Cecilia Schulberg
UWEC McIntyre Library - Main Stacks
Call # ML 3920. S3627
296 pages Human Sciences Press, Inc. ( 1981)
233 Spring Street, New York, N.Y. 10013

This work provides an extensive overview of music therapy activities which can be used in conjunction with related disciplines. Each activity is systematically categorized and then analyzed according to required skills and abilities, goals, and procedures. The author offers a wide range of programs which can be adapted to the populations of varying ages and abilities. Music therapy activities are presented with such categories as: relaxation, exercise, dance, games. music appreciation, art, musical instruments, bibliotherapy, drama. eurythmics, guided imagery, transactional analysis, music
education and psychiatric musicology.


Breathing Techniques

Top

Call #: Main Stacks BF575 .S575 543 C.1
Stress/Unstress: How You Can Control Stress At Home And On The Job by Keith W. Sehnert M.D.  c.1981

This book shows many different ways of managing stress.  One of the Top 10 Quick Stress Relaxers was that of the bathroom singer.  The author says that people in all walks of life have found that there’s more to singing in the bathtub or shower than meets the ears.  Loud singing necessitates deep abdominal breathing which relaxes the singer.  Holding your favorite notes for a long time, in combination with the heat of the shower or bath water, provides a generally relaxing experience.  This book has many good suggestions for managing stress.

Children

Top

Call #: Main Stacks ML3845 .D695
Music In The Life Of Man by Julius Portnoy  c.1963

The roles that music has played in our lives have undergone many changes.  Ancient philosophers believed that music could steel the mind and discipline emotions.  Therefore, they thought music should be an important part of a child’s education.  Chapter Six deals with the therapeutic value of music.  It gives suggestions for several different techniques.  The book explains how music can change metabolism, affect muscular energy, raise or lower blood pressure, and influence digestion.

Michel, Donald E., Ph.D. Music Therapy: An Introduction to Therapy and Special Education Through Music. Springfield,
Illinois Charles C Thomas, 1976.

The purpose of this book is to describe music therapy and music in special education. It explains how music therapy works with different kinds of patients and contexts. It also describes therapeutic goals and methodology for dealing with and treating several disorders, such as anxiety disorders. The book ends with a discussion of music therapy education and the training that is required in this field.
Call number: ML 3920.M48.

Reciprocal Inhibition in Music Therapy: A Case Study Involving Wind Instrument Usage to Attenuate Fear, Anxiety, and Avoidance Reactivity in a Child with Pervasive Development Disorder
Paul D. Hoelzley
UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Music Therapy Journal 1991, Vol.10, No.1, 58-76

This article describes how wind instruments were used to reciprocally inhibit the strong fear, anxiety, and avoidance behavior of a 6- year-old girl with pervasive development disorder. Within the context of music therapy intervention, it was hypothesized that if fear-provoking stimuli ( i.e. the wind instruments as
feared objects) occurred simultaneously with fear-inhibiting stimuli ( i.e., the sounds of the wind instruments) the tie linking the instruments to the fear could be weakened or eliminated. This article explains the course of therapy with this child with PDD and the music therapist. During the course of music therapy the client showed considerable improvement in fine motor skills, attention span, and
levels of compliance and frustration tolerance. The article provides background information on PDD, explains the case history, and descibes music therapy assessment.

The Effects of Music and Relaxation on Third Trimester Anxiety in Adolescent Pregnancy
Sammi S. Liebman and Alleen MacLaren
UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Journal of Music Therapy, XXVIII (2) 1991, 89-100

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a music and relaxation intervention on anxiety levels with a population of pregnant adolescents. Nineteen girls provided data for the experimental group ( those subjects receiving music therapy intervention), while 20 girls provided data for the control group
(those subjects not receiving music therapy intervention). The article describes the procedures, a discussion and the results of the test.


Title: Music Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety and Fear in Terminal Pediatric Patients
Author: Trudy Shulman Fagen
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library
Music Therapy Journal Vol. 2 no.1, 1982 p. 13-23


This article explains how Music Therapy is an effective tool in uncovering and working through fears and anxieties related to death and mourning. The population examined here is the latency age child and early adolescent at the end stage of life- from time of diagnosis of terminal illness to death. Presented are excerpts of case studies that display a variety of music therapy techniques.

Cognitive

Top

Title: The Fun of Stress
Author: Producer Laurie Donnelly
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: NUMBER: ACL0820 on order
Boston: WGBH, 1997
2 videocassettes (116 min)

This video set features Loretta LaRoche, a nationally recognized speaker on stress management. Loretta shows the effects of stress on the mind and body and offers ways to help viewers put their lives back into perspective by getting a handle on their stress. It also offers wacky, irreverent ways to ward off stress with humor.

Title: Principles and Practice of Stress Management
Edition: 2nd ed.
Author: Lehrer, Paul M.,Woolfolk, Robert L
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: RA785 .P75 1993
New York : Guilford Press, c1993.
Description: xvi, 621 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.

The following topics are covered in this book:

  • Context of stress management
  • Progressive relaxation: origins, principles, and clinical applications
  • Progressive relaxation: abbreviated methods
  • Yoga-based therapy
  • Modern forms of meditation
  • Hypnosuggestive approach to stress reduction
  • Autogenic training method
  • Autogenic biofeedback in psychophysiological therapy and stress management
  • Biofeedback methods in the treatment of anxiety and stress disorders
  • Role of respiration in stress and stress control
  • Cognitive approaches to stress
  • Stress inoculation training
  • Music therapy and stress management
  • Use of aerobic exercise as a method of stress management
  • Pharmacological approach to the management of stress and anxiety
  • Specific effects of stress management techniques
  • Research on clinical issues in stress management
  • Differential effects of stress management therapies on emotional status and behavior
  • Differential effects of stress management therapies in behavioral medicine


Title: "A smorgasbord of stress-stoppers."
Author: Capri, John
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: JOURNALS MICROFICHE Psychology Today 29:35+ Jan/Feb '96<br><br>

This article provides information on stress management. The author lists some helpful tips and techniques to help reduce stress. There is also a defintion of some of the chemical effects related to stress and the psysiological responses throughout the body.

Call #:  Main Stacks RA785 .B73
Managing Stress: Keeping Calm Under Fire by Barbara J. Braham c.1994

This book contains a wide range of topics on stress.  The following topics are included: the causes of stress, understanding it, its symptoms, and a step by step process, called the "CALM Model."  There are also other coping strategies described that can be combined with soothing background music, such as relaxation and guided imagery.

Call #: Main Stacks BF 575 .S75 B75
Between Health and Illness: New Notions On Stress and The Nature Of Wellbeing by Barbara Brown  c.1984

This book tells us that between health and illness there are many states of unwellness.  These are times when mind and body are taxed by the demands made on us by the different worlds of people with whom we live and by the demands we make of ourselves to be and do what we or our society expect us to be and do.  The book stresses the point of detecting and dealing with stress before it causes any serious damage to a person’s wellbeing.  Chapter 10, Simon Says Cope, was particularly interesting.  It describes several different coping techniques.  The book goes on to suggest a new way of thinking about wellness and explains how everyday things can cause stress.  The author suggests imagery as a good way to reduce stress.  One tool that may aid an individual’s imagery is music.  Relaxing music (quiet and instrumental is best) will automatically put one’s mind at ease.  Music will give the person a sense of warmth and may trigger some pleasant/happy memories.

Call #: Main Stacks ML3830 M96 P96
The Psychology of Music by James L. Mursell  c.1937

The purpose of this book is to bring together the research materials bearing upon the psychology of music.  The book was written primarily with the musical reader in mind rather than a psychologist.  Chapter One, The Appeal of Music, contained a lot of information that would be beneficial to this topic.  It talked about how music delays the onset of muscular fatigue, and under certain conditions increases the efficiency of mental work.

Call #: The Futurist, May 98, vol.32, issue4, p40
Music and Stress Reduction  author unknown

In this article researchers have found that music alters the amount of cortisol, a stress hormone, that the body releases.  In one study, patients undergoing a stressful diagnostic procedure were allowed to select background music to accompany the procedure.  A control group who heard no music during the procedure experienced a large increase in levels of cortisol, while the music-listening patients had significantly lower levels.  In addition to stress reduction, music has also been shown to affect memory and cognition by increasing release of hormones.

Adaman, J. E. and P. H. Blaney. “The effects of musical mood induction on creativitiy.” Journal of Creative Behavior
29(2) (1995): 95-108.

The researchers in this study used musical mood induction to induce either elated, depressed, or neutral moods in undergraduate college students. The mood was induced by using three twenty-minute musical induction tapes that had been developed and approved by M. F. Pignatiello et al. The tapes
related to elated, depressed, and neutral conditions. Familiarity with the music played, the ability to concentrate during the mood induction, the years of musical training, and the enjoyment of the music presented were all assessed in relation to changes in mood scores. The elated subjects had a
significantly higher score than depressed subjects on mood ratings and elated and depressed groups were significantly more creative than the neutral groups. (Bound) shelved by title.

Podolsky, Edward, M.D. Music Therapy. New York Philosophical Library, 1954.
Call number: ML 3920.P752.

This book discusses several different areas of music therapy such as the physiology of patients, techniques of music therapy, music therapy in relation to different goal areas, mental health, music and medicine, and limitations in the research in music therapy. It also defines and discusses anxiety disorders
and the effectiveness and uses of music therapy in these areas.

Stratton, V. N. Ph.D. and Annette H. Salanowski, M.A. "The Relationship Between Characteristic Moods and most Commonly Listened to Types of Music." Journal of Music Therapy
34(2) (1997): 129-140.

This journal article is of great merit to music therapy. The researchers surveyed three samples of participants to find out their typical moods and the type of music that they usually listen to. Through doing this research they found out what types of music tended to induce anxiety, depression, and hostility, and what groups of people were affected this way. The main finding in their research was that negative moods are more likely to lead to music listening than for listening to music to induce their negative moods.
(Current) shelved by title.

Title: Music and Your Emotions
Author: Alexander Capurso
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Main Stacks
Call #: ML 3920.M896
128 pages Liveright Publishing Corporation
386 Fourth Avenue ( 1952)
New York 16, N.Y.

This is a clinical guide to music selection associated with desired emotional responses. A large number of ingenious observations have been collected and recorded, in schools, clinics, hospitals, and industrial institutions. The experiments proceeded along two main lines: (1) investigation of the effect music has on the physiological functions of the human organism, and (2) study of its influence upon the human mind. The book attempts to do three things: 1) to introduce the reader to the broad problems of the relationship of music to emotions; 2) to outline the scientist¹s quest for a suitable approach to the problem; and 3) to present the results of two major studies designed to relate mood changes to particular stimuli.

Title: Reciprocal Inhibition in Music Therapy: A Case Study Involving Wind Instrument Usage to Attenuate Fear, Anxiety, and Avoidance Reactivity in a Child with Pervasive Development Disorder
Author: Paul D. Hoelzley
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Music Therapy Journal 1991, Vol.10, No.1, 58-76

This article describes how wind instruments were used to reciprocally inhibit the strong fear, anxiety, and avoidance behavior of a 6- year-old girl with pervasive development disorder. Within the context of music therapy intervention, it was hypothesized that if fear-provoking stimuli ( i.e. the wind instruments as
feared objects) occurred simultaneously with fear-inhibiting stimuli ( i.e., the sounds of the wind instruments) the tie linking the instruments to the fear could be weakened or eliminated. This article explains the course of therapy with this child with PDD and the music therapist. During the course of music therapy the client showed considerable improvement in fine motor skills, attention span, and
levels of compliance and frustration tolerance. The article provides background information on PDD, explains the case history, and descibes music therapy assessment.

Title: Comparisons of Cognitive, Music, and Imagery Techniques on Anxiety Reduction with University Students
Author: Lori A. Russell
Location: UWEC-McIntyre Library - Bound Journals
Journal of College Student Development V.33 Jan- Nov. 1992

This article explains the effectiveness of imagery, music, and cognitive therapeutic techniques in the reduction of anxiety. Two questions were asked when they did this study: (1) ³ Which techniques (imagery, music, and a cognitive intervention) were the most effective in lowering anxiety as compared to a control group and to each other?² (2) ³ What were the effects of imagery, music, and a cognitive intervention on the different types of anxiety ( state and trait)?²


Community

Top


Title: "Stress and blood donation: effects of music and previous donation experience."
Author: Ferguson, Eamonn., Singh, A P., Cunningham-Snell, N.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: JOURNALS CURRENT The British Journal of Psychology 88:277-94 May'97

This paper explains how music may be used as a stress intervention technique, especially in clinical settings. It is based on a study involving blood donors. The paper examines the effects of music on the experience of stress associated with blood donation.

Coping Techniques

Top


Title: Job Stress Interventions
Edition: 1st ed.
Author: Murphy, Lawrence R.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: HF5548.85 .J655 1995
Published: Washington, DC : American Psychological Association, c1995.
Description: xiii, 439 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.

Derived from the 1992 conference, Stress in the 90s: a changing workforce in a changing workplace, this reference includes bibliographical references and indexes. The following topics are included:

  • Effects of instruction on stress management skills
  • The development of an anger management training program for law enforcement personnel
  • Stress inoculation training for staff working with persons with mental retardation
  • A worksite stress management program
  • Worksite health promotion
  • The caregiver support program
  • An investigation of job-related coping strategies
  • A strategy for developing and testing preventive interventions
  • Coping with job loss and career stress
  • Redesigning work system to reduce stress
  • Interdependence and personal well-being in a training environment
  • Appraising occupational stress-related disorders
  • These strategies and reports are beneficial to a therapy program dealing with stress management.


Title: Comprehensive Stress Management
Edition: 4th ed.
Author: Greenberg, Jerrold S.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: BF575.S75 G66 1993
Dubuque, IA. : Brown & Benchmark, c1993.
Description: xvi, 460 p. : ill ; 24 cm.

This is a textbook filled with useful information regarding stress and stress management. The text provides several scales and measurement tools to analyze the levels of stress and anxiety for individuals. The author also went into detail describing possible coping techniques. This information can be useful in understanding the scope and boundaries in treating and managing stress through music therapy.

Call #: Main Stacks BF 575 .S75 G57 1985
Controlling Stress and Tension: A Holistic Approach by George S. Everly Jr. Ph.D & Daniel A. Girdano Ph.D  c.1986

This book teaches how to control stress through using a holistic approach.  This method operates on many levels.  It combines several techniques into a complete system.  The holistic system consists of three phases which parallel the three parts of this book: 1 - Body and Mind In Health and Disease, 2 - What Causes Stress and What Is Your Stress Profile?, and 3 - How To Prevent and Reduce Stress: Intervention and Management Techniques.  The book goes into depth about the three phases and tells us the importance of and how to evaluate each phase.  The author states that the first essential component to reduce stress is a quiet environment.  Once you have let out the dogs and cats, many people find it helpful to play a record or tape of soft instrumental sounds, or use any of the numerous environmental sounds which have been commercially recorded.  Besides blocking out noise, such sounds help promote a sense of relaxation, as this usually brings back memories of pleasant feelings.

Call #:  Main Stacks  BF 575 .S75 G48
Stress and the Bottom Line by E.M. Gherman M.D.  c.1981

This book contains personal and corporate approaches to dealing with both positive and negative stress.  The approaches are designed to help us understand and cope effectively with stress.  Chapters 13 through 19 deal with specific techniques of managing stress.  The book explains that everyone has the ability to reduce stress arousal and prevent stress related disease.  It states that stress is unavoidable, but it can be directed and controlled to provide the energy for health, growth, and the development of human potential.  Listening to soothing instrumental music, letting yourself float with the melody, imagining yourself in a soothing environment, and allowing music to relax your muscles may help relieve tension.

Justice, R. W. "Music Therapy Interventions for People with Eating Disorders in an Inpatient Setting." Music Therapy Perspectives 12(2) (1994): 104-110.

This journal article spoke of the psychological and physical aspects of anorexia nervosa and bulemia. It also discussed interventions and goals in relaxation techniques involving music, structured music therapy session techniques, and "insight-oriented music and imagery techniques." Music therapy in this area helps the patient take control, learn new coping skills for anxiety and stress, and develop expressions of emotionand about themselves. (Current) shelved by title.

Priestly, Mary. Music Therapy In Action. New York St. Martin's Press, 1975.
Call number: ML 3920.P88.

The author's purpose in writing this book was to talk about what generally happens in music therapy. This book discusses different techniques in music therapy and presents case studies to help the reader understand music therapy more clearly. It also discusses the benefits of using music therapy when treating
anxiety disorders. Music has a natural calming effect which assists in the treatment of these disorders when nothing else can.

Title: Music Therapy and Stress Reduction Research
Author: Suzanne B. Hanser
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Journal of Music Therapy, XXII (4), 1985, 193-206


This article recognizes the effects of anxiety and stress on human behavior. This paper attempts to define anxiety, also referred to as stress and tension, and presents 2 models for coping with it. The role of music in palliative and instrumental modes of coping is explored. A review of music therapy and stress
reduction identifies problems in methodology and in the operational definitions of ³relaxing² or ³sedative² music. Different techniques for measuring relaxation are discussed.


Dance

Top

Call #:  US News and World Report  May 6, 1997, vol.122, issue22, p17
Drumming To The Rhythms Of Life by Dorian Friedman

This article talks about the importance of drumming.  It reports that drumming is becoming an important therapeutic tool.  In nursing homes "drum circles" and other forms of music therapy help Alzheimer’s patients focus.  Some patients who seemed otherwise confused could nonetheless tap perfectly on cue.  Patients who were unable to speak could sing childhood melodies, and those barely able to walk were able to dance a waltz.  It concludes that while no amount of drumming can cure the disease, it can improve the quality of life and offer another way for family members to communicate with their loved ones.


Employers

Top

Title: Job Stress Interventions
Edition: 1st ed.
Author: Murphy, Lawrence R.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: HF5548.85 .J655 1995
Published: Washington, DC : American Psychological Association, c1995.
Description: xiii, 439 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.

Derived from the 1992 conference, Stress in the 90s: a changing workforce in a changing workplace, this reference includes bibliographical references and indexes. The following topics are included:

  • Effects of instruction on stress management skills
  • The development of an anger management training program for law enforcement personnel
  • Stress inoculation training for staff working with persons with mental retardation
  • A worksite stress management program
  • Worksite health promotion
  • The caregiver support program
  • An investigation of job-related coping strategies
  • A strategy for developing and testing preventive interventions
  • Coping with job loss and career stress
  • Redesigning work system to reduce stress
  • Interdependence and personal well-being in a training environment
  • Appraising occupational stress-related disorders

These strategies and reports are beneficial to a therapy program dealing with stress management.



Title: "Stress, relaxation & pleasure "
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: JOURNALS MICROFILM SupervisionJun 1995, v56n6, p. 14-18 (5 pages)

This article states that according to a survey by Harris Research, the main cause of office stress is overwork, with 50% of respondents worldwide claiming to be either too busy or being understaffed. When the world's office workers get home, their preferred ways of unwinding after a stressful day in the office include talking to friends, listening to music, reading, and watching TV. This article reinforces the usefulness of some commonly known stress relievers.


Emotional Status

Top

Title: The Fun of Stress
Author: Producer Laurie Donnelly
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: NUMBER: ACL0820
Boston: WGBH, 1997
2 videocassettes (116 min)

This video set features Loretta LaRoche, a nationally recognized speaker on stress management. Loretta shows the effects of stress on the mind and body and offers ways to help viewers put their lives back into perspective by getting a handle on their stress. It also offers wacky, irreverent ways to ward off stress with humor.

Call #: Main Stacks ML3920 .M896
Music and Your Emotions by Emil A. Gutheil  c.1992

This book describes the influence of music on human emotions.  It presents major studies, such as the Carpuso study, which was designed to test moods associated with certain pieces of music, and tells how listening to a certain type of music can produce a desired emotion.

Call #: Main Stacks ML3845 .D695
Music In The Life Of Man by Julius Portnoy  c.1963

The roles that music has played in our lives have undergone many changes.  Ancient philosophers believed that music could steel the mind and discipline emotions.  Therefore, they thought music should be an important part of a child’s education.  Chapter Six deals with the therapeutic value of music.  It gives suggestions for several different techniques.  The book explains how music can change metabolism, affect muscular energy, raise or lower blood pressure, and influence digestion.

Justice, R. W. "Music Therapy Interventions for People with Eating Disorders in an Inpatient Setting." Music Therapy Perspectives 12(2) (1994): 104-110.

This journal article spoke of the psychological and physical aspects of anorexia nervosa and bulemia. It also discussed interventions and goals in relaxation techniques involving music, structured music therapy session techniques, and "insight-oriented music and imagery techniques." Music therapy in this area helps the patient take control, learn new coping skills for anxiety and stress, and develop expressions of emotionand about themselves. (Current) shelved by title.


Title: Music and Your Emotions
Author: Alexander Capurso
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Main Stacks
Call #: ML 3920.M896
128 pages Liveright Publishing Corporation
386 Fourth Avenue ( 1952)
New York 16, N.Y.

This is a clinical guide to music selection associated with desired emotional responses. A large number of ingenious observations have been collected and recorded, in schools, clinics, hospitals, and industrial institutions. The experiments proceeded along two main lines: (1) investigation of the effect music
has on the physiological functions of the human organism, and (2) study of its influence upon the human mind. The book attempts to do three things: 1) to introduce the reader to the broad problems of the relationship of music to emotions; 2) to outline the scientist¹s quest for a suitable approach to the problem;
and 3) to present the results of two major studies designed to relate mood changes to particular stimuli.

Title: Reciprocal Inhibition in Music Therapy: A Case Study Involving Wind Instrument Usage to Attenuate Fear, Anxiety, and Avoidance Reactivity in a Child with Pervasive Development Disorder
Author: Paul D. Hoelzley
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Music Therapy Journal 1991, Vol.10, No.1, 58-76

This article describes how wind instruments were used to reciprocally inhibit the strong fear, anxiety, and avoidance behavior of a 6- year-old girl with pervasive development disorder. Within the context of music therapy intervention, it was hypothesized that if fear-provoking stimuli ( i.e. the wind instruments as
feared objects) occurred simultaneously with fear-inhibiting stimuli ( i.e., the sounds of the wind instruments) the tie linking the instruments to the fear could be weakened or eliminated. This article explains the course of therapy with this child with PDD and the music therapist. During the course of music therapy the client showed considerable improvement in fine motor skills, attention span, and
levels of compliance and frustration tolerance. The article provides background information on PDD, explains the case history, and descibes music therapy assessment.

Title: The Music Therapy Source Book
Author: Cecilia Schulberg
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Main Stacks
Call # ML 3920. S3627
296 pages Human Sciences Press, Inc. ( 1981)
233 Spring Street, New York, N.Y. 10013


This work provides an extensive overview of music therapy activities which can be used in conjunction with related disciplines. Each activity is systematically categorized and then analyzed according to required skills and abilities, goals, and procedures. The author offers a wide range of programs which can be adapted to the populations of varying ages and abilities. Music therapy activities are presented with such categories as: relaxation, exercise, dance, games. music appreciation, art, musical instruments, bibliotherapy, drama. eurythmics, guided imagery, transactional analysis, music education and psychiatric musicology.


Exercise

Top

Title: Principles and Practice of Stress Management
Edition: 2nd ed.
Author: Lehrer, Paul M.,Woolfolk, Robert L
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: RA785 .P75 1993
New York : Guilford Press, c1993.
Description: xvi, 621 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.

Summary: The following topics are covered in this book:

  • Context of stress management
  • Progressive relaxation: origins, principles, and clinical applications
  • Progressive relaxation: abbreviated methods
  • Yoga-based therapy
  • Modern forms of meditation
  • Hypnosuggestive approach to stress reduction
  • Autogenic training method
  • Autogenic biofeedback in psychophysiological therapy and stress management
  • Biofeedback methods in the treatment of anxiety and stress disorders
  • Role of respiration in stress and stress control
  • Cognitive approaches to stress
  • Stress inoculation training
  • Music therapy and stress management
  • Use of aerobic exercise as a method of stress management
  • Pharmacological approach to the management of stress and anxiety
  • Specific effects of stress management techniques
  • Research on clinical issues in stress management
  • Differential effects of stress management therapies on emotional status and behavior
  • Differential effects of stress management therapies in behavioral medicine


Title: The Music Therapy Source Book
Author: Cecilia Schulberg
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Main Stacks
Call # ML 3920. S3627
296 pages Human Sciences Press, Inc. ( 1981)
233 Spring Street, New York, N.Y. 10013

This work provides an extensive overview of music therapy activities which can be used in conjunction with related disciplines. Each activity is systematically categorized and then analyzed according to required skills and abilities, goals, and procedures. The author offers a wide range of programs which can be adapted to the populations of varying ages and abilities. Music therapy activities are presented with such categories as: relaxation, exercise, dance, games. music appreciation, art, musical instruments, bibliotherapy, drama. eurythmics, guided imagery, transactional analysis, music education and psychiatric musicology.


Geriatrics

Top




Humor Techniques

Top

Title: The Fun of Stress
Author: Producer Laurie Donnelly
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: NUMBER: ACL0820 on order
Boston: WGBH, 1997
2 videocassettes (116 min)

This video set features Loretta LaRoche, a nationally recognized speaker on stress management. Loretta shows the effects of stress on the mind and body and offers ways to help viewers put their lives back into perspective by getting a handle on their stress. It also offers wacky, irreverent ways to ward off stress with humor. 


Imagery

Top

Call #:  Main Stacks RA785 .B73
Managing Stress: Keeping Calm Under Fire by Barbara J. Braham c.1994

This book contains a wide range of topics on stress.  The following topics are included: the causes of stress, understanding it, its symptoms, and a step by step process, called the "CALM Model."  There are also other coping strategies described that can be combined with soothing background music, such as relaxation and guided imagery.

Call #: Main Stacks BF 575 .S75 B75
Between Health and Illness: New Notions On Stress and The Nature Of Wellbeing by Barbara Brown  c.1984

This book tells us that between health and illness there are many states of unwellness.  These are times when mind and body are taxed by the demands made on us by the different worlds of people with whom we live and by the demands we make of ourselves to be and do what we or our society expect us to be and do.  The book stresses the point of detecting and dealing with stress before it causes any serious damage to a person’s wellbeing.  Chapter 10, Simon Says Cope, was particularly interesting.  It describes several different coping techniques.  The book goes on to suggest a new way of thinking about wellness and explains how everyday things can cause stress.  The author suggests imagery as a good way to reduce stress.  One tool that may aid an individual’s imagery is music.  Relaxing music (quiet and instrumental is best) will automatically put one’s mind at ease.  Music will give the person a sense of warmth and may trigger some pleasant/happy memories.

Call #:  Main Stacks  BF 575 .S75 G48
Stress and the Bottom Line by E.M. Gherman M.D.  c.1981

This book contains personal and corporate approaches to dealing with both positive and negative stress.  The approaches are designed to help us understand and cope effectively with stress.  Chapters 13 through 19 deal with specific techniques of managing stress.  The book explains that everyone has the ability to reduce stress arousal and prevent stress related disease.  It states that stress is unavoidable, but it can be directed and controlled to provide the energy for health, growth, and the development of human potential.  Listening to soothing instrumental music, letting yourself float with the melody, imagining yourself in a soothing environment, and allowing music to relax your muscles may help relieve tension.

Byrnes, S. R. "The Effect of Audio, Video, and Paired Audio-Video Stimuli on the Experience of Stress." Journal of Music Therapy 33(4) (1996): 248-260.

In this study the researcher was measuring "subjects' ongoing experienced level of stress as they received audio, video, or combined audio-video stimuli." For all of the conditions the level of stress and anxiety was pretty low and the stimuli usually decreased stress. The most significant change from
before and after stress levels was when they received the combined audio-video condition.
(Current) shelved by title.

Hammer, S.E. "The Effects of Guided Imagery Through Music on State and Trait Anxiety." Journal of Music Therapy 33(1) (1996): 47-70.

This journal article discussed the effects of Guided Imagery through Music (GIM)and different techniques for relaxation on state and trait anxiety levels. This research investigated the effects of GIM on perceived stress levels. The findings showed that there may be some benefits in using GIM for people who have chronic anxiety and stress.
(Current) shelved by title.

Justice, R. W. "Music Therapy Interventions for People with Eating Disorders in an Inpatient Setting." Music Therapy Perspectives 12(2) (1994): 104-110.

This journal article spoke of the psychological and physical aspects of anorexia nervosa and bulemia. It also discussed interventions and goals in relaxation techniques involving music, structured music therapy session techniques, and "insight-oriented music and imagery techniques." Music therapy in this area helps the patient take control, learn new coping skills for anxiety and stress, and develop expressions of emotionand about themselves.
(Current) shelved by title.

Title: Comparisons of Cognitive, Music, and Imagery Techniques on Anxiety Reduction with University Students
Author: Lori A. Russell
Location: UWEC-McIntyre Library - Bound Journals
Journal of College Student Development V.33 Jan- Nov. 1992

This article explains the effectiveness of imagery, music, and cognitivetherapeutic techniques in the reduction of anxiety. Two questions were asked when they did this study: (1) ³ Which techniques( imagery, music, and a cognitive intervention) were the most effective in lowering anxiety as compared to a control group and to each other?² (2) ³ What were the effects of imagery, music, and a
cognitive intervention on the different types of anxiety ( state and trait)?²

Title: The Music Therapy Source Book
Author: Cecilia Schulberg
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Main Stacks
Call # ML 3920. S3627
296 pages Human Sciences Press, Inc. ( 1981)
233 Spring Street, New York, N.Y. 10013

This work provides an extensive overview of music therapy activities which can be used in conjunction with related disciplines. Each activity issystematically categorized and then analyzed according to required skills and abilities, goals, and procedures. The author offers a wide range of programs which can be adapted to the populations of varying ages and abilities. Music therapy activities are presented with such categories as: relaxation, exercise, dance, games. music appreciation, art, musical instruments, bibliotherapy, drama. eurythmics, guided imagery, transactional analysis, music education and psychiatric musicology.


Listening

Top

Title: "Stress, relaxation & pleasure"
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: JOURNALS MICROFILM Supervision Jun 1995, v56n6, p. 14-18 (5 pages)

This article states that according to a survey by Harris Research, the main cause of office stress is overwork, with 50% of respondents worldwide claiming to be either too busy or being understaffed. When the world's office workers get home, their preferred ways of unwinding after a stressful day in the office include talking to friends, listening to music, reading, and watching TV. This article reinforces the usefulness of some commonly known stress relievers.

Title: "By any other name, it would sound sweeter"
Author: Le Guin, Elisabeth.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call#: New York Times (Late New York Edition) 1+ (Sec 2) Jul 31 '94

This article discusses how New Age music has received an inordinate amount of scorn, especially among music critics, yet the market for this relaxing, accessible music continues to grow. The writer discusses the attraction of New Age music and its purported ability to relieve stress and questions whether it truly engages listeners.

Call #:  RN, Aug 95, vol.58 issue8, p14
How To Alleviate Preop Stress: Play Music For Patients by T. Baker, S. Paskin & M.J. Winter

In this article, researchers found that patients’ stress levels can be reduced significantly if they listen to music before surgery.  The study included 62 same-day surgery patients whose average age was 37.  The subjects were divided into 2 groups, one that allowed patients to listen to the music and the other that was a control group.  The researchers assessed the subjects’ preop stress levels with the State-Trait Anxiety Intervention Test, a questionnaire that distinguishes between stress that occurs in response to a specific situation and that which is present on a daily basis.  When the researchers analyzed the responses, they found that the music group’s stress levels had been significantly reduced and were lower than those of the control group.

Call #: Main Stacks BF 575 .S75 F67
The Personal Stress Reduction Program by Jeffrey W. Forman  c.1987

This textbook has information on stress and stress management.  The author describes healthy ways to relieve stress, such as exercising, controlled breathing, and listening to relaxation tapes, and offers a personalized approach to developing a stress reduction plan that fits in with the individual’s life.  One of the first suggestions that the author gives is to take time out of your day to reflect.  One tool that may help you is listening to a relaxing musical tape.  By doing this the music will help to lower your heart rate and bring you to a relaxed state more quickly.

Call #:  US News and World Report  May 6, 1997, vol.122, issue22, p17
Drumming To The Rhythms Of Life by Dorian Friedman

This article talks about the importance of drumming.  It reports that drumming is becoming an important therapeutic tool.  In nursing homes "drum circles" and other forms of music therapy help Alzheimer’s patients focus.  Some patients who seemed otherwise confused could nonetheless tap perfectly on cue.  Patients who were unable to speak could sing childhood melodies, and those barely able to walk were able to dance a waltz.  It concludes that while no amount of drumming can cure the disease, it can improve the quality of life and offer another way for family members to communicate with their loved ones.

Call #: Main Stacks ML3838 .S3
The Effects Of Music by Esther L. Gatewood  c.1927

Results from a study on the effect of music on mood conducted by Max Schoen and Esther L. Gatewood showed that, in general, a musical composition produces a change in the existing mood of the listener.  A new mood can be induced on a person dealing with stress by listening to music or doing some sort of musical activity.

Call #:  Main Stacks  BF 575 .S75 G48
Stress and the Bottom Line by E.M. Gherman M.D.  c.1981

This book contains personal and corporate approaches to dealing with both positive and negative stress.  The approaches are designed to help us understand and cope effectively with stress.  Chapters 13 through 19 deal with specific techniques of managing stress.  The book explains that everyone has the ability to reduce stress arousal and prevent stress related disease.  It states that stress is unavoidable, but it can be directed and controlled to provide the energy for health, growth, and the development of human potential.  Listening to soothing instrumental music, letting yourself float with the melody, imagining yourself in a soothing environment, and allowing music to relax your muscles may help relieve tension.

Call #: Main Stacks RA785 .P38
Breaking the Stress Habit: A Modern Guide To One-Minute Stress Management by Andrew Goliszek  c.1987

The author refers to stress as the "Disease of the Twentieth Century".  The book gives us tips on how to break the stress habit so that the quality of life is better.  There are four steps that we need to follow.  The book describes in great detail about how stress affects the body.  It suggests that music can be a big factor in helping relax people because they can concentrate on the music and forget about other distractions.  The book then gives some titles of music that may benefit people.  Some people have found that music is also a big factor in helping them relax because they can concentrate on the music and forget about other distractions.  The author warns that when listening to music it is important to make sure that it’s not too loud and never too harsh.  The author makes suggestions of music that would be appropriate.  Good music for relaxation is any tape of soft, classical music by Handel (Largo, for example), Bach (Air on G String, for instance), Saint-Saens (The Swan, for example), or another favorite composition that’s soothing, soft, and melodic.

Call #: Main Stacks ML3920 .L695
The Healing Energies of Music by Hal A. Lingerman  c.1983

This book focuses on listening to music with an open heart, a willing mind and a relaxed body.  The author explains that the full power of music can be received by better learning how to relax and link with the melodies that the individuals are hearing.

Call #: Journal of Holistic Nursing, Jun92, vol.10, issue2, p101-107
Effects of Music Preference and Selection On Stress Reduction by Gail C. Mornhinweg Ph.D, R.N.

The purpose of this research was to identify the effects of three types of music on perceived stress levels and to see if a correlation existed between music preference, music played, and stress reduction.  Music preference was identified, stress level was assessed, music was played, and stress level was reassessed with 58 subjects.  The results of this study show that the type of music listened to does make a difference in the level of perceived relaxation.  Although none of the sample was familiar with New Age music, this music was found to have a significant effect on relaxation.  Assuming that we relax with "familiar" music, then the subjects should have found popular music relaxing; the contrary effect resulted.  The subjects’ perceived relaxed state decreased and their heart rates increased when popular music was played.

Title: The Effects of Music Therapy on Anxiety in Chronically Ill Patients
Author: Jodi-Levine Gross and Roberts Swartz
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library
Music Therapy Journal Vol 2 no.1, 1982 p.43-51

This article explains the areas of high anxiety levels in elderly and chronically ill adults. It explains music¹s effects on various types of anxiety disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine whether participation in music therapy would produce changes in the ³trait² and ³state² anxiety of chronically ill hospitalized patients. The results showed that listening to happy, stimulating music elicited higher levels of anxiety than sad, sedate music and was less likely to reduce ³ state² anxiety. It also showed that exciting music produced more aggression as well as higher levels of anxiety than calm and no music
situations.


Meditation

Top

Title: Principles and Practice of Stress Management
Edition: 2nd ed.
Author: Lehrer, Paul M.,Woolfolk, Robert L
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: RA785 .P75 1993
New York : Guilford Press, c1993.
Description: xvi, 621 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.

Summary: The following topics are covered in this book:

  • Context of stress management
  • Progressive relaxation: origins, principles, and clinical applications
  • Progressive relaxation: abbreviated methods
  • Yoga-based therapy
  • Modern forms of meditation
  • Hypnosuggestive approach to stress reduction
  • Autogenic training method
  • Autogenic biofeedback in psychophysiological therapy and stress management
  • Biofeedback methods in the treatment of anxiety and stress disorders
  • Role of respiration in stress and stress control
  • Cognitive approaches to stress
  • Stress inoculation training
  • Music therapy and stress management
  • Use of aerobic exercise as a method of stress management
  • Pharmacological approach to the management of stress and anxiety
  • Specific effects of stress management techniques
  • Research on clinical issues in stress management
  • Differential effects of stress management therapies on emotional status and behavior
  • Differential effects of stress management therapies in behavioral medicine



Motor Skills

Top

Title: The Fun of Stress
Author: Producer Laurie Donnelly
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: NUMBER: ACL0820
Boston: WGBH, 1997
2 videocassettes (116 min)

This video set features Loretta LaRoche, a nationally recognized speaker on stress management. Loretta shows the effects of stress on the mind and body and offers ways to help viewers put their lives back into perspective by getting a handle on their stress. It also offers wacky, irreverent ways to ward off stress with humor.

Title: Principles and Practice of Stress Management
Edition: 2nd ed.
Author: Lehrer, Paul M.,Woolfolk, Robert L
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: RA785 .P75 1993
New York : Guilford Press, c1993.
Description: xvi, 621 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.

The following topics are covered in this book:

  • Context of stress management
  • Progressive relaxation: origins, principles, and clinical applications
  • Progressive relaxation: abbreviated methods
  • Yoga-based therapy
  • Modern forms of meditation
  • Hypnosuggestive approach to stress reduction
  • Autogenic training method
  • Autogenic biofeedback in psychophysiological therapy and stress management
  • Biofeedback methods in the treatment of anxiety and stress disorders
  • Role of respiration in stress and stress control
  • Cognitive approaches to stress
  • Stress inoculation training
  • Music therapy and stress management
  • Use of aerobic exercise as a method of stress management
  • Pharmacological approach to the management of stress and anxiety
  • Specific effects of stress management techniques
  • Research on clinical issues in stress management
  • Differential effects of stress management therapies on emotional status and behavior
  • Differential effects of stress management therapies in behavioral medicine


Call #:  Main Stacks RA785 .B73
Managing Stress: Keeping Calm Under Fire by Barbara J. Braham c.1994

This book contains a wide range of topics on stress.  The following topics are included: the causes of stress, understanding it, its symptoms, and a step by step process, called the "CALM Model."  There are also other coping strategies described that can be combined with soothing background music, such as relaxation and guided imagery.

Call #: Main Stacks BF 575 .S75 B75
Between Health and Illness: New Notions On Stress and The Nature Of Wellbeing by Barbara Brown  c.1984

This book tells us that between health and illness there are many states of unwellness.  These are times when mind and body are taxed by the demands made on us by the different worlds of people with whom we live and by the demands we make of ourselves to be and do what we or our society expect us to be and do.  The book stresses the point of detecting and dealing with stress before it causes any serious damage to a person’s wellbeing.  Chapter 10, Simon Says Cope, was particularly interesting.  It describes several different coping techniques.  The book goes on to suggest a new way of thinking about wellness and explains how everyday things can cause stress.  The author suggests imagery as a good way to reduce stress.  One tool that may aid an individual’s imagery is music.  Relaxing music (quiet and instrumental is best) will automatically put one’s mind at ease.  Music will give the person a sense of warmth and may trigger some pleasant/happy memories.


Music Composition

Top

Call #: Main Stacks ML3838 .S3
The Effects Of Music by Esther L. Gatewood  c.1927

Results from a study on the effect of music on mood conducted by Max Schoen and Esther L. Gatewood showed that, in general, a musical composition produces a change in the existing mood of the listener.  A new mood can be induced on a person dealing with stress by listening to music or doing some sort of musical activity.

Call #: Main Stacks RA785 .P38
Breaking the Stress Habit: A Modern Guide To One-Minute Stress Management by Andrew Goliszek  c.1987

The author refers to stress as the "Disease of the Twentieth Century".  The book gives us tips on how to break the stress habit so that the quality of life is better.  There are four steps that we need to follow.  The book describes in great detail about how stress affects the body.  It suggests that music can be a big factor in helping relax people because they can concentrate on the music and forget about other distractions.  The book then gives some titles of music that may benefit people.  Some people have found that music is also a big factor in helping them relax because they can concentrate on the music and forget about other distractions.  The author warns that when listening to music it is important to make sure that it’s not too loud and never too harsh.  The author makes suggestions of music that would be appropriate.  Good music for relaxation is any tape of soft, classical music by Handel (Largo, for example), Bach (Air on G String, for instance), Saint-Saens (The Swan, for example), or another favorite composition that’s soothing, soft, and melodic.


New Age Music

Top

Title: "By any other name, it would sound sweeter"
Author: Le Guin, Elisabeth.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call#: New York Times (Late New York Edition) 1+ (Sec 2) Jul 31 '94

This article discusses how New Age music has received an inordinate amount of scorn, especially among music critics, yet the market for this relaxing, accessible music continues to grow. The writer discusses the attraction of New Age music and its purported ability to relieve stress and questions whether it truly engages listeners.

Call #: Journal of Holistic Nursing, Jun92, vol.10, issue2,p101-107
Effects of Music Preference and Selection On Stress Reduction by Gail C. Mornhinweg Ph.D, R.N.

The purpose of this research was to identify the effects of three types of music on perceived stress levels and to see if a correlation existed between music preference, music played, and stress reduction.  Music preference was identified, stress level was assessed, music was played, and stress level was reassessed with 58 subjects.  The results of this study show that the type of music listened to does make a difference in the level of perceived relaxation.  Although none of the sample was familiar with New Age music, this music was found to have a significant effect on relaxation.  Assuming that we relax with "familiar" music, then the subjects should have found popular music relaxing; the contrary effect resulted.  The subjects’ perceived relaxed state decreased and their heart rates increased when popular music was played.

Call #: Main Stacks BF503 .A24
Achievement, Stress and Anxiety  author unknown  c.1982

This book contains studies on how certain noises/noise levels can affect your concentration and your stress level.  It was found that noises, such as traffic noise, can decrease your concentration and increase your stress level while doing a daily task.  Music masks background noise and lowers stress levels.  One of the simplest ways to mask background noise is to listen to some kind of relaxing music.  The music should be gentle, quiet, and soothing music.  Some studies show that New Age music also can lower stress levels.


Performance

Top

Call #:  US News and World Report  May 6, 1997, vol.122, issue22, p17
Drumming To The Rhythms Of Life by Dorian Friedman

This article talks about the importance of drumming.  It reports that drumming is becoming an important therapeutic tool.  In nursing homes "drum circles" and other forms of music therapy help Alzheimer’s patients focus.  Some patients who seemed otherwise confused could nonetheless tap perfectly on cue.  Patients who were unable to speak could sing childhood melodies, and those barely able to walk were able to dance a waltz.  It concludes that while no amount of drumming can cure the disease, it can improve the quality of life and offer another way for family members to communicate with their loved ones.

Title: Music Therapy and Stress Reduction Research
Author: Suzanne B. Hanser
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Journal of Music Therapy, XXII (4), 1985, 193-206

This article recognizes the effects of anxiety and stress on human behavior. This paper attempts to define anxiety, also referred to as stress and tension, and presents two models for coping with it. The role of music in palliative and instrumental modes of coping is explored. A review of music therapy and stress
reduction identifies problems in methodology and in the operational definitions of ³relaxing² or ³sedative² music. Different techniques for measuring relaxation are discussed.

Title: Reciprocal Inhibition in Music Therapy: A Case Study Involving Wind Instrument Usage to Attenuate Fear, Anxiety, and Avoidance Reactivity in a Child with Pervasive Development Disorder
Author: Paul D. Hoelzley
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Music Therapy Journal 1991, Vol.10, No.1, 58-76

This article describes how wind instruments were used to reciprocally inhibit the strong fear, anxiety, and avoidance behavior of a 6- year-old girl with pervasive development disorder. Within the context of music therapy intervention, it was hypothesized that if fear-provoking stimuli ( i.e. the wind instruments as
feared objects) occurred simultaneously with fear-inhibiting stimuli ( i.e., the sounds of the wind instruments) the tie linking the instruments to the fear could be weakened or eliminated. This article explains the course of therapy with this child with PDD and the music therapist. During the course of music therapy the client showed considerable improvement in fine motor skills, attention span, and
levels of compliance and frustration tolerance. The article provides background information on PDD, explains the case history, and descibes music therapy assessment.


Personal

Top

Title: The Fun of Stress
Author: Producer Laurie Donnelly
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: NUMBER: ACL0820
Boston: WGBH, 1997
2 videocassettes (116 min)

This video set features Loretta LaRoche, a nationally recognized speaker on stress management. Loretta shows the effects of stress on the mind and body and offers ways to help viewers put their lives back into perspective by getting a handle on their stress. It also offers wacky, irreverent ways to ward off stress with humor.

Title: Job Stress Interventions
Edition: 1st ed.
Author: Murphy, Lawrence R.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: HF5548.85 .J655 1995
Published: Washington, DC : American Psychological Association, c1995.
Description: xiii, 439 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.

Derived from the 1992 conference, Stress in the 90s: a changing workforce in a changing workplace, this reference includes bibliographical references and indexes. The following topics are included:

  • Effects of instruction on stress management skills
  • The development of an anger management training program for law enforcement personnel
  • Stress inoculation training for staff working with persons with mental retardation
  • A worksite stress management program
  • Worksite health promotion
  • The caregiver support program
  • An investigation of job-related coping strategies
  • A strategy for developing and testing preventive interventions
  • Coping with job loss and career stress
  • Redesigning work system to reduce stress
  • Interdependence and personal well-being in a training environment
  • Appraising occupational stress-related disorders

These strategies and reports are beneficial to a therapy program dealing with stress management.



Title: Comprehensive Stress Management
Edition: 4th ed.
Author: Greenberg, Jerrold S.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: BF575.S75 G66 1993
Dubuque, IA. : Brown & Benchmark, c1993.
Description: xvi, 460 p. : ill ; 24 cm.

This is a textbook filled with useful information regarding stress and stress management. The text provides several scales and measurement tools to analyze the levels of stress and anxiety for individuals. The author also went into detail describing possible coping techniques. This information can be useful in understanding the scope and boundaries in treating and managing stress through music therapy.

Title: Principles and Practice of Stress Management
Edition: 2nd ed.
Author: Lehrer, Paul M.,Woolfolk, Robert L
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: RA785 .P75 1993
New York : Guilford Press, c1993.
Description: xvi, 621 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.

The following topics are covered in this book:

  • Context of stress management
  • Progressive relaxation: origins, principles, and clinical applications
  • Progressive relaxation: abbreviated methods
  • Yoga-based therapy
  • Modern forms of meditation
  • Hypnosuggestive approach to stress reduction
  • Autogenic training method
  • Autogenic biofeedback in psychophysiological therapy and stress management
  • Biofeedback methods in the treatment of anxiety and stress disorders
  • Role of respiration in stress and stress control
  • Cognitive approaches to stress
  • Stress inoculation training
  • Music therapy and stress management
  • Use of aerobic exercise as a method of stress management
  • Pharmacological approach to the management of stress and anxiety
  • Specific effects of stress management techniques
  • Research on clinical issues in stress management
  • Differential effects of stress management therapies on emotional status and behavior
  • Differential effects of stress management therapies in behavioral medicine


Title: Stress, relaxation & pleasur
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: JOURNALS MICROFILM Supervision Jun 1995, v56n6, p. 14-18 (5 pages)

This article states that according to a survey by Harris Research, the main cause of office stress is overwork, with 50% of respondents worldwide claiming to be either too busy or being understaffed. When the world's office workers get home, their preferred ways of unwinding after a stressful day in the office include talking to friends, listening to music, reading, and watching TV. This article reinforces the usefulness of some commonly known stress relievers.

Call #: Main Stacks BF 575 .S75 B75
Between Health and Illness: New Notions On Stress and The Nature Of Wellbeing by Barbara Brown  c.1984

This book tells us that between health and illness there are many states of unwellness.  These are times when mind and body are taxed by the demands made on us by the different worlds of people with whom we live and by the demands we make of ourselves to be and do what we or our society expect us to be and do.  The book stresses the point of detecting and dealing with stress before it causes any serious damage to a person’s wellbeing.  Chapter 10, Simon Says Cope, was particularly interesting.  It describes several different coping techniques.  The book goes on to suggest a new way of thinking about wellness and explains how everyday things can cause stress.  The author suggests imagery as a good way to reduce stress.  One tool that may aid an individual’s imagery is music.  Relaxing music (quiet and instrumental is best) will automatically put one’s mind at ease.  Music will give the person a sense of warmth and may trigger some pleasant/happy memories.

Call #: Main Stacks BF 575 .S75 F67
The Personal Stress Reduction Program by Jeffrey W. Forman  c.1987

This textbook has information on stress and stress management.  The author describes healthy ways to relieve stress, such as exercising, controlled breathing, and listening to relaxation tapes, and offers a personalized approach to developing a stress reduction plan that fits in with the individual’s life.  One of the first suggestions that the author gives is to take time out of your day to reflect.  One tool that may help you is listening to a relaxing musical tape.  By doing this the music will help to lower your heart rate and bring you to a relaxed state more quickly.


Physical Status

Top

Call #: Main Stacks BF 575 .S75 F67
The Personal Stress Reduction Program by Jeffrey W. Forman  c.1987

This textbook has information on stress and stress management.  The author describes healthy ways to relieve stress, such as exercising, controlled breathing, and listening to relaxation tapes, and offers a personalized approach to developing a stress reduction plan that fits in with the individual’s life.  One of the first suggestions that the author gives is to take time out of your day to reflect.  One tool that may help you is listening to a relaxing musical tape.  By doing this the music will help to lower your heart rate and bring you to a relaxed state more quickly.

Call #:  US News and World Report  May 6, 1997, vol.122, issue22, p17
Drumming To The Rhythms Of Life by Dorian Friedman

This article talks about the importance of drumming.  It reports that drumming is becoming an important therapeutic tool.  In nursing homes "drum circles" and other forms of music therapy help Alzheimer’s patients focus.  Some patients who seemed otherwise confused could nonetheless tap perfectly on cue.  Patients who were unable to speak could sing childhood melodies, and those barely able to walk were able to dance a waltz.  It concludes that while no amount of drumming can cure the disease, it can improve the quality of life and offer another way for family members to communicate with their loved ones.

Call #: Main Stacks BF575 .S75 L413
Stress: Sources, Management, & Prevention by Lennart Levi M.D.  c.1967

This book defines stress in general and then breaks it down into several smaller categories.  It stresses that the mind and body work together as one.  The book also talks about Mental Hygiene and describes the importance of it.  The book describes the correlation between music and nerve impulses.

Call #: Journal of Holistic Nursing, Jun92, vol.10, issue2,p101-107
Effects of Music Preference and Selection On Stress Reduction by Gail C. Mornhinweg Ph.D, R.N.

The purpose of this research was to identify the effects of three types of music on perceived stress levels and to see if a correlation existed between music preference, music played, and stress reduction.  Music preference was identified, stress level was assessed, music was played, and stress level was reassessed with 58 subjects.  The results of this study show that the type of music listened to does make a difference in the level of perceived relaxation.  Although none of the sample was familiar with New Age music, this music was found to have a significant effect on relaxation.  Assuming that we relax with "familiar" music, then the subjects should have found popular music relaxing; the contrary effect resulted.  The subjects’ perceived relaxed state decreased and their heart rates increased when popular music was played.

Call #: Main Stacks ML3845 .D695
Music In The Life Of Man by Julius Portnoy  c.1963

The roles that music has played in our lives have undergone many changes.  Ancient philosophers believed that music could steel the mind and discipline emotions.  Therefore, they thought music should be an important part of a child’s education.  Chapter Six deals with the therapeutic value of music.  It gives suggestions for several different techniques.  The book explains how music can change metabolism, affect muscular energy, raise or lower blood pressure, and influence digestion.

Call #: Main Stacks BF575 .S575 543 C.1
Stress/Unstress: How You Can Control Stress At Home And On The Job by Keith W. Sehnert M.D.  c.1981

This book shows many different ways of managing stress.  One of the Top 10 Quick Stress Relaxers was that of the bathroom singer.  The author says that people in all walks of life have found that there’s more to singing in the bathtub or shower than meets the ears.  Loud singing necessitates deep abdominal breathing which relaxes the singer.  Holding your favorite notes for a long time, in combination with the heat of the shower or bath water, provides a generally relaxing experience.  This book has many good suggestions for managing stress.

Title: The Effects of Different Types of Relaxation Music on Tension Level
Author: Thomas G. Logan and Allan R. Roberts
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Bound Journals
Journal of Music Therapy, XXI (4), 1984, 177-183

This study compared the effects of two different kinds of relaxation music on tension level during a single 20 minute training session. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of different types of relaxation music on subjects¹ momentary tension level

Title: The Music Therapy Source Book
Author: Cecilia Schulberg
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Main Stacks
Call # ML 3920. S3627
296 pages Human Sciences Press, Inc. ( 1981)
233 Spring Street, New York, N.Y. 10013

This work provides an extensive overview of music therapy activities which can be used in conjunction with related disciplines. Each activity is systematically categorized and then analyzed according to required skills and abilities, goals, and procedures. The author offers a wide range of programs which can be adapted to the populations of varying ages and abilities. Music therapy activities are presented with such categories as: relaxation, exercise, dance, games. music appreciation, art, musical instruments, bibliotherapy, drama. eurythmics, guided imagery, transactional analysis, music education and psychiatric musicology.


Physiological Status

Top

Title: "A smorgasbord of stress-stoppers."
Author: Capri, John.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: JOURNALS MICROFICHE Psychology Today 29:35+ Jan/Feb '96

This article provides information on stress management. The author lists some helpful tips and techniques to help reduce stress. There is also a defintion of some of the chemical effects related to stress and the psysiological responses throughout the body.

Alvin, Juliette. Music Therapy. New York Basic Books, Inc., P, 1966.
Call number: ML 3920.A66 1975.

The author of this book traced the history of music and ancient beliefs about the healing power of music to the uses of music today in music therapy to the uses of music and trends of it in the future. The author also wrote about the uses of music in healing, the physiological and psychological effects of music on
people and in specific contexts, and the practices of music therapy.

Podolsky, Edward, M.D. Music Therapy. New York Philosophical Library, 1954.
Call number: ML 3920.P752.

This book discusses several different areas of music therapy such as the physiology of patients, techniques of music therapy, music therapy in relation to different goal areas, mental health, music and medicine, and limitations in the research in music therapy. It also defines and discusses anxiety disorders and the effectiveness and uses of music therapy in these areas.

Strauser, J. M. "The Effects of Music Versus Silence on Measures of State Anxiety, Perceived Relaxation, and Physiological Responses of Patients Receiving Chiropractic Interventions." Journal of
Music Therapy
34(2) (1997): 88-105.
(Current) shelved by title.

This researcher studied "the effects of music versus silence on measures of state anxiety, perceived relaxation, and physiological responses of chiropractic patients prior to and immediately following chiropractic treatment interventions." The study found that there weren't any significant differences among
the different physiological measurements for the different conditions.

Title: Music and Your Emotions
Author: Alexander Capurso
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Main Stacks
Call #: ML 3920.M896
128 pages Liveright Publishing Corporation
386 Fourth Avenue ( 1952)
New York 16, N.Y.

This is a clinical guide to music selection associated with desired emotional responses. A large number of ingenious observations have been collected and recorded, in schools, clinics, hospitals, and industrial institutions. The experiments proceeded along two main lines: (1) investigation of the effect music
has on the physiological functions of the human organism, and (2) study of its influence upon the human mind. The book attempts to do three things: 1) to introduce the reader to the broad problems of the relationship of music to emotions; 2) to outline the scientist¹s quest for a suitable approach to the problem;
and 3) to present the results of two major studies designed to relate mood changes to particular stimuli.

Psychological Status

Top

Call #: Main Stacks ML3830 M96 P96
The Psychology of Music by James L. Mursell  c.1937

The purpose of this book is to bring together the research materials bearing upon the psychology of music.  The book was written primarily with the musical reader in mind rather than a psychologist.  Chapter One, The Appeal of Music, contained a lot of information that would be beneficial to this topic.  It talked about how music delays the onset of muscular fatigue, and under certain conditions increases the efficiency of mental work.

Alvin, Juliette. Music Therapy. New York Basic Books, Inc., P, 1966.
Call number: ML 3920.A66 1975.

The author of this book traced the history of music and ancient beliefs about the healing power of music to the uses of music today in music therapy to the uses of music and trends of it in the future. The author also wrote about the uses of music in healing, the physiological and psychological effects of music on people and in specific contexts, and the practices of music therapy.

Byrnes, S. R. "The Effect of Audio, Video, and Paired Audio-Video Stimuli on the Experience of Stress." Journal of Music Therapy 33(4) (1996): 248-260.
(Current) shelved by title.

In this study the researcher was measuring 'subjects' ongoing experienced level of stress as they received audio, video, or combined audio-video stimuli." For all of the conditions the level of stress and anxiety was pretty low and the stimuli usually decreased stress. The most significant change from before and after stress levels was when they received the combined audio-video condition.

Justice, R. W. "Music Therapy Interventions for People with Eating Disorders in an Inpatient Setting." Music Therapy Perspectives 12(2) (1994): 104-110.
(Current) shelved by title.

This journal article spoke of the psychological and physical aspects of anorexia nervosa and bulemia. It also discussed interventions and goals in relaxation techniques involving music, structured music therapy session techniques, and "insight-oriented music and imagery techniques." Music therapy in this area helps the patient take control, learn new coping skills for anxiety and stress, and develop expressions of emotion and about themselves.

Michel, Donald E., Ph.D. Music Therapy: An Introduction to Therapy and Special Education Through Music. Springfield, Illinois Charles C Thomas, 1976.
Call number: ML 3920.M48.

The purpose of this book is to describe music therapy and music in special education. It explains how music therapy works with different kinds of patients and contexts. It also describes therapeutic goals and methodology for dealing with and treating several disorders, such as anxiety disorders. The book ends with a discussion of music therapy education and the training that is required in this field.


Title: Music and Your Emotions
Author: Alexander Capurso
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Main Stacks
Call #: ML 3920.M896
128 pages Liveright Publishing Corporation
386 Fourth Avenue ( 1952)
New York 16, N.Y.

This is a clinical guide to music selection associated with desired emotional responses. A large number of ingenious observations have been collected and recorded, in schools, clinics, hospitals, and industrial institutions. The experiments proceeded along two main lines: (1) investigation of the effect music
has on the physiological functions of the human organism, and (2) study of its influence upon the human mind. The book attempts to do three things: 1) to introduce the reader to the broad problems of the relationship of music to emotions; 2) to outline the scientist¹s quest for a suitable approach to the problem;
and 3) to present the results of two major studies designed to relate mood changes to particular stimuli.

Title: The Music Therapy Source Book
Author: Cecilia Schulberg
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Main Stacks
Call # ML 3920. S3627
296 pages Human Sciences Press, Inc. ( 1981)
233 Spring Street, New York, N.Y. 10013

This work provides an extensive overview of music therapy activities which can be used in conjunction with related disciplines. Each activity is systematically categorized and then analyzed according to required skills and abilities, goals, and procedures. The author offers a wide range of programs which can be adapted to the populations of varying ages and abilities. Music therapy activities are presented with such categories as: relaxation, exercise, dance, games. music appreciation, art, musical instruments, bibliotherapy, drama. eurythmics, guided imagery, transactional analysis, music education and psychiatric musicology.

Title: Music Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety and Fear in Terminal Pediatric Patients
Author: Trudy Shulman Fagen
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library
Music Therapy Journal Vol. 2 no.1, 1982 p. 13-23

This article explains how Music Therapy is an effective tool in uncovering and working through fears and anxieties related to death and mourning. The population examined here is the latency age child and early adolescent at the end stage of life- from time of diagnosis of terminal illness to death. Presented
are excerpts of case studies that display a variety of music therapy techniques.

Title: Clinical Applications of Music and Chemotherapy: The Effects on Nausea and Emesis
Author: Jayne M. Standly
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Bound Journals
Music Therapy Perspectives 1992 Vol 10 (1) 27-35

This article provides an overview of a summer demonstration program combining music listening with chemotherapy treatment and discusses the results of an exploratory study on the subsequent effects. The side effects of chemotherapy are varied and range in magnitude from minor to traumatic pain, illness, anxiety, and/ or psychological morbidity. It discusses a new clinical application of music therapy: music listening to reduce the side effects of chemotherapy. Data was collected on 15 people who completed
four or more chemotherapy treatments under one of several conditions isolating the influence of music. In conclusion, the patients and staff reacted very favorably to the benefits of music listening during chemotherapy.

Relaxation

Top

Title: "Stress, relaxation & pleasure"
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: JOURNALS MICROFILM SupervisionJun 1995, v56n6, p. 14-18 (5 pages)

This article states that according to a survey by Harris Research, the main cause of office stress is overwork, with 50% of respondents worldwide claiming to be either too busy or being understaffed. When the world's office workers get home, their preferred ways of unwinding after a stressful day in the office include talking to friends, listening to music, reading, and watching TV. This article reinforces the usefulness of some commonly known stress relievers.

Title: "By any other name, it would sound sweeter"
Author: Le Guin, Elisabeth.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call#: New York Times (Late New York Edition) 1+ (Sec 2) Jul 31 '94

This article discusses how New Age music has received an inordinate amount of scorn, especially among music critics, yet the market for this relaxing, accessible music continues to grow. The writer discusses the attraction of New Age music and its purported ability to relieve stress and questions whether it truly engages listeners.

Call #:  Main Stacks RA785 .B73
Managing Stress: Keeping Calm Under Fire by Barbara J. Braham c.1994

This book contains a wide range of topics on stress.  The following topics are included: the causes of stress, understanding it, its symptoms, and a step by step process, called the "CALM Model."  There are also other coping strategies described that can be combined with soothing background music, such as relaxation and guided imagery.

Call #: Main Stacks BF 575 .S75 B75
Between Health and Illness: New Notions On Stress and The Nature Of Wellbeing by Barbara Brown  c.1984

This book tells us that between health and illness there are many states of unwellness.  These are times when mind and body are taxed by the demands made on us by the different worlds of people with whom we live and by the demands we make of ourselves to be and do what we or our society expect us to be and do.  The book stresses the point of detecting and dealing with stress before it causes any serious damage to a person’s wellbeing.  Chapter 10, Simon Says Cope, was particularly interesting.  It describes several different coping techniques.  The book goes on to suggest a new way of thinking about wellness and explains how everyday things can cause stress.  The author suggests imagery as a good way to reduce stress.  One tool that may aid an individual’s imagery is music.  Relaxing music (quiet and instrumental is best) will automatically put one’s mind at ease.  Music will give the person a sense of warmth and may trigger some pleasant/happy memories.

Call #: Main Stacks BF 575 .S75 G57 1985
Controlling Stress and Tension: A Holistic Approach by George S. Everly Jr. Ph.D & Daniel A. Girdano Ph.D  c.1986

This book teaches how to control stress through using a holistic approach.  This method operates on many levels.  It combines several techniques into a complete system.  The holistic system consists of three phases which parallel the three parts of this book: 1 - Body and Mind In Health and Disease, 2 - What Causes Stress and What Is Your Stress Profile?, and 3 - How To Prevent and Reduce Stress: Intervention and Management Techniques.  The book goes into depth about the three phases and tells us the importance of and how to evaluate each phase.  The author states that the first essential component to reduce stress is a quiet environment.  Once you have let out the dogs and cats, many people find it helpful to play a record or tape of soft instrumental sounds, or use any of the numerous environmental sounds which have been commercially recorded.  Besides blocking out noise, such sounds help promote a sense of relaxation, as this usually brings back memories of pleasant feelings.

Call #: Main Stacks BF 575 .S75 F67
The Personal Stress Reduction Program by Jeffrey W. Forman  c.1987

This textbook has information on stress and stress management.  The author describes healthy ways to relieve stress, such as exercising, controlled breathing, and listening to relaxation tapes, and offers a personalized approach to developing a stress reduction plan that fits in with the individual’s life.  One of the first suggestions that the author gives is to take time out of your day to reflect.  One tool that may help you is listening to a relaxing musical tape.  By doing this the music will help to lower your heart rate and bring you to a relaxed state more quickly.

Call #:  Main Stacks  BF 575 .S75 G48
Stress and the Bottom Line by E.M. Gherman M.D.  c.1981

This book contains personal and corporate approaches to dealing with both positive and negative stress.  The approaches are designed to help us understand and cope effectively with stress.  Chapters 13 through 19 deal with specific techniques of managing stress.  The book explains that everyone has the ability to reduce stress arousal and prevent stress related disease.  It states that stress is unavoidable, but it can be directed and controlled to provide the energy for health, growth, and the development of human potential.  Listening to soothing instrumental music, letting yourself float with the melody, imagining yourself in a soothing environment, and allowing music to relax your muscles may help relieve tension.

Call #: Main Stacks RA785 .P38
Breaking the Stress Habit: A Modern Guide To One-Minute Stress Management by Andrew Goliszek  c.1987

The author refers to stress as the "Disease of the Twentieth Century".  The book gives us tips on how to break the stress habit so that the quality of life is better.  There are four steps that we need to follow.  The book describes in great detail about how stress affects the body.  It suggests that music can be a big factor in helping relax people because they can concentrate on the music and forget about other distractions.  The book then gives some titles of music that may benefit people.  Some people have found that music is also a big factor in helping them relax because they can concentrate on the music and forget about other distractions.  The author warns that when listening to music it is important to make sure that it’s not too loud and never too harsh.  The author makes suggestions of music that would be appropriate.  Good music for relaxation is any tape of soft, classical music by Handel (Largo, for example), Bach (Air on G String, for instance), Saint-Saens (The Swan, for example), or another favorite composition that’s soothing, soft, and melodic.

Call #: Main Stacks BF575 .S75 H38
The Joy of Stress by Peter G. Hanson  c.1986

This book tells how stress can be looked at in either a negative or positive manner.  Depending on a person’s attitude towards a situation, the outcome can either be good or bad.  If the dangers of stress are respected, then a person can learn to harness its benefits.  Ways that were suggested to "harness" stress include using relaxation techniques and slow breathing and using music as a distraction from bad stress.  How music can be used as a motivation for good stress was described.

Call #: Main Stacks BF575 .S75 L413
Stress: Sources, Management, & Prevention by Lennart Levi M.D.  c.1967

This book defines stress in general and then breaks it down into several smaller categories.  It stresses that the mind and body work together as one.  The book also talks about Mental Hygiene and describes the importance of it.  The book describes the correlation between music and nerve impulses.

Call #: Main Stacks ML3920 .L695
The Healing Energies of Music by Hal A. Lingerman  c.1983

This book focuses on listening to music with an open heart, a willing mind and a relaxed body.  The author explains that the full power of music can be received by better learning how to relax and link with the melodies that the individuals are hearing.

Call #: Journal of Holistic Nursing, Jun92, vol.10, issue2,p101-107
Effects of Music Preference and Selection On Stress Reduction by Gail C. Mornhinweg Ph.D, R.N.

The purpose of this research was to identify the effects of three types of music on perceived stress levels and to see if a correlation existed between music preference, music played, and stress reduction.  Music preference was identified, stress level was assessed, music was played, and stress level was reassessed with 58 subjects.  The results of this study show that the type of music listened to does make a difference in the level of perceived relaxation.  Although none of the sample was familiar with New Age music, this music was found to have a significant effect on relaxation.  Assuming that we relax with "familiar" music, then the subjects should have found popular music relaxing; the contrary effect resulted.  The subjects’ perceived relaxed state decreased and their heart rates increased when popular music was played.

Call #: Main Stacks BF575 .S575 543 C.1
Stress/Unstress: How You Can Control Stress At Home And On The Job by Keith W. Sehnert M.D.  c.1981

This book shows many different ways of managing stress.  One of the Top 10 Quick Stress Relaxers was that of the bathroom singer.  The author says that people in all walks of life have found that there’s more to singing in the bathtub or shower than meets the ears.  Loud singing necessitates deep abdominal breathing which relaxes the singer.  Holding your favorite notes for a long time, in combination with the heat of the shower or bath water, provides a generally relaxing experience.  This book has many good suggestions for managing stress.

Call #: Main Stacks BF503 .A24
Achievement, Stress and Anxiety  author unknown  c.1982

This book contains studies on how certain noises/noise levels can affect your concentration and your stress level.  It was found that noises, such as traffic noise, can decrease your concentration and increase your stress level while doing a daily task.  Music masks background noise and lowers stress levels.  One of the simplest ways to mask background noise is to listen to some kind of relaxing music.  The music should be gentle, quiet, and soothing music.  Some studies show that New Age music also can lower stress levels.

Hammer, S.E. "The Effects of Guided Imagery Through Music on State and Trait Anxiety." Journal of Music Therapy 33(1) (1996): 47-70.
(Current) shelved by title.

This journal article discussed the effects of Guided Imagery through Music (GIM)and different techniques for relaxation on state and trait anxiety levels. This research investigated the effects of GIM on perceived stress levels. The findings showed that there may be some benefits in using GIM for people who have
chronic anxiety and stress.


Strauser, J. M. "The Effects of Music Versus Silence on Measures of State Anxiety, Perceived Relaxation, and Physiological Responses of Patients Receiving Chiropractic Interventions." Journal of
Music Therapy
34(2) (1997): 88-105.
(Current) shelved by title.

This researcher studied "the effects of music versus silence on measures of state anxiety, perceived relaxation, and physiological responses of chiropractic patients prior to and immediately following chiropractic treatment interventions." The study found that there weren't any significant differences among
the different physiological measurements for the different conditions.

Title: Music Therapy and Stress Reduction Research
Author: Suzanne B. Hanser
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Journal of Music Therapy, XXII (4), 1985, 193-206

This article recognizes the effects of anxiety and stress on human behavior. This paper attempts to define anxiety, also referred to as stress and tension, and presents 2 models for coping with it. The role of music in palliative and instrumental modes of coping is explored. A review of music therapy and stress
reduction identifies problems in methodology and in the operational definitions of ³relaxing² or ³sedative² music. Different techniques for measuring relaxation are discussed.

Title: The Effects of Different Types of Relaxation Music on Tension Level
Author: Thomas G. Logan and Allan R. Roberts
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Bound Journals
Journal of Music Therapy, XXI (4), 1984, 177-183

This study compared the effects of two different kinds of relaxation music on tension level during a single 20 minute training session. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of different types of relaxation music on subjects¹ momentary tension level.

Title: The Music Therapy Source Book
Author: Cecilia Schulberg
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Main Stacks
Call # ML 3920. S3627
296 pages Human Sciences Press, Inc. ( 1981)
233 Spring Street, New York, N.Y. 10013

This work provides an extensive overview of music therapy activities which can be used in conjunction with related disciplines. Each activity is systematically categorized and then analyzed according to required skills and abilities, goals, and procedures. The author offers a wide range of programs which can be adapted to the populations of varying ages and abilities. Music therapy activities are presented with such categories as: relaxation, exercise, dance, games. music appreciation, art, musical instruments, bibliotherapy, drama. eurythmics, guided imagery, transactional analysis, music
education and psychiatric musicology.

Research

Top

Title: Principles and Practice of Stress Management
Edition: 2nd ed.
Author: Lehrer, Paul M.,Woolfolk, Robert L
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: RA785 .P75 1993
New York : Guilford Press, c1993.
Description: xvi, 621 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.

The following topics are covered in this book:

  • Context of stress management
  • Progressive relaxation: origins, principles, and clinical applications
  • Progressive relaxation: abbreviated methods
  • Yoga-based therapy
  • Modern forms of meditation
  • Hypnosuggestive approach to stress reduction
  • Autogenic training method
  • Autogenic biofeedback in psychophysiological therapy and stress management
  • Biofeedback methods in the treatment of anxiety and stress disorders
  • Role of respiration in stress and stress control
  • Cognitive approaches to stress
  • Stress inoculation training
  • Music therapy and stress management
  • Use of aerobic exercise as a method of stress management
  • Pharmacological approach to the management of stress and anxiety
  • Specific effects of stress management techniques
  • Research on clinical issues in stress management
  • Differential effects of stress management therapies on emotional status and behavior
  • Differential effects of stress management therapies in behavioral medicine


Title: "Stress and blood donation: effects of music and previous donation experience."
Author: Ferguson, Eamonn., Singh, A P., Cunningham-Snell, N.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: JOURNALS CURRENT The British Journal of Psychology 88:277-94 May'97

This paper explains how music may be used as a stress intervention technique, especially in clinical settings. It is based on a study involving blood donors. The paper examines the effects of music on the experience of stress associated with blood donation.

Title: "By any other name, it would sound sweeter"
Author: Le Guin, Elisabeth.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call#: New York Times (Late New York Edition) 1+ (Sec 2) Jul 31 '94

This article discusses how New Age music has received an inordinate amount of scorn, especially among music critics, yet the market for this relaxing, accessible music continues to grow. The writer discusses the attraction of New Age music and its purported ability to relieve stress and questions whether it truly engages listeners.

Call #: Main Stacks BF 575 .S75 G57 1985
Controlling Stress and Tension: A Holistic Approach by George S. Everly Jr. Ph.D & Daniel A. Girdano Ph.D  c.1986

This book teaches how to control stress through using a holistic approach.  This method operates on many levels.  It combines several techniques into a complete system.  The holistic system consists of three phases which parallel the three parts of this book: 1 - Body and Mind In Health and Disease, 2 - What Causes Stress and What Is Your Stress Profile?, and 3 - How To Prevent and Reduce Stress: Intervention and Management Techniques.  The book goes into depth about the three phases and tells us the importance of and how to evaluate each phase.  The author states that the first essential component to reduce stress is a quiet environment.  Once you have let out the dogs and cats, many people find it helpful to play a record or tape of soft instrumental sounds, or use any of the numerous environmental sounds which have been commercially recorded.  Besides blocking out noise, such sounds help promote a sense of relaxation, as this usually brings back memories of pleasant feelings.

Call #: Main Stacks ML3920 .M896
Music and Your Emotions by Emil A. Gutheil  c.1992

This book describes the influence of music on human emotions.  It presents major studies, such as the Carpuso study, which was designed to test moods associated with certain pieces of music, and tells how listening to a certain type of music can produce a desired emotion.

Call #: Journal of Holistic Nursing, Jun92, vol.10, issue2,p101-107
Effects of Music Preference and Selection On Stress Reduction by Gail C. Mornhinweg Ph.D, R.N.

The purpose of this research was to identify the effects of three types of music on perceived stress levels and to see if a correlation existed between music preference, music played, and stress reduction.  Music preference was identified, stress level was assessed, music was played, and stress level was reassessed with 58 subjects.  The results of this study show that the type of music listened to does make a difference in the level of perceived relaxation.  Although none of the sample was familiar with New Age music, this music was found to have a significant effect on relaxation.  Assuming that we relax with "familiar" music, then the subjects should have found popular music relaxing; the contrary effect resulted.  The subjects’ perceived relaxed state decreased and their heart rates increased when popular music was played.

Call #: Main Stacks BF503 .A24
Achievement, Stress and Anxiety  author unknown  c.1982

This book contains studies on how certain noises/noise levels can affect your concentration and your stress level.  It was found that noises, such as traffic noise, can decrease your concentration and increase your stress level while doing a daily task.  Music masks background noise and lowers stress levels.  One of the simplest ways to mask background noise is to listen to some kind of relaxing music.  The music should be gentle, quiet, and soothing music.  Some studies show that New Age music also can lower stress levels.

Adaman, J. E. and P. H. Blaney. “The effects of musical mood induction on creativitiy.” Journal of Creative Behavior 29(2) (1995): 95-108.
(Bound) shelved by title.

The researchers in this study used musical mood induction to induce either elated, depressed, or neutral moods in undergraduate college students. The mood was induced by using three twenty-minute musical induction tapes that had been developed and approved by M. F. Pignatiello et al. The tapes
related to elated, depressed, and neutral conditions. Familiarity with the music played, the ability to concentrate during the mood induction, the years of musical training, and the enjoyment of the music presented were all assessed in relation to changes in mood scores. The elated subjects had a
significantly higher score than depressed subjects on mood ratings and elated and depressed groups were significantly more creative than the neutral groups.

Alvin, Juliette. Music Therapy. New York Basic Books, Inc., P, 1966.
Call number: ML 3920.A66 1975.

The author of this book traced the history of music and ancient beliefs about the healing power of music to the uses of music today in music therapy to the uses of music and trends of it in the future. The author also wrote about the uses of music in healing, the physiological and psychological effects of music on people and in specific contexts, and the practices of music therapy.

Byrnes, S. R. "The Effect of Audio, Video, and Paired Audio-Video Stimuli on the Experience of Stress." Journal of Music Therapy 33(4) (1996): 248-260.
(Current) shelved by title.

In this study the researcher was measuring 'subjects' ongoing experienced level of stress as they received audio, video, or combined audio-video stimuli." For all of the conditions the level of stress and anxiety was pretty low and the stimuli usually decreased stress. The most significant change from before and after stress levels was when they received the combined audio-video condition.



Hammer, S.E. "The Effects of Guided Imagery Through Music on State and Trait Anxiety." Journal of Music Therapy 33(1) (1996): 47-70.
(Current) shelved by title.

This journal article discussed the effects of Guided Imagery through Music (GIM)and different techniques for relaxation on state and trait anxiety levels. This research investigated the effects of GIM on perceived stress levels. The findings showed that there may be some benefits in using GIM for people who have chronic anxiety and stress.

Stratton, V. N. Ph.D. and Annette H. Salanowski, M.A. "The Relationship Between Characteristic Moods and most Commonly Listened to Types of Music." Journal of Music Therapy
34(2) (1997): 129-140.
(Current) shelved by title.

This journal article is of great merit to music therapy. The researchers surveyed three samples of participants to find out their typical moods and the type of music that they usually listen to. Through doing this research they found out what types of music tended to induce anxiety, depression, and hostility, and what groups of people were affected this way. The main finding in their research was that negative moods are more likely to lead to music listening than for listening to music to induce their negative moods.

Strauser, J. M. "The Effects of Music Versus Silence on Measures of State Anxiety, Perceived Relaxation, and Physiological Responses of Patients Receiving Chiropractic Interventions." Journal of
Music Therapy
34(2) (1997): 88-105.
(Current) shelved by title.

This researcher studied "the effects of music versus silence on measures of state anxiety, perceived relaxation, and physiological responses of chiropractic patients prior to and immediately following chiropractic treatment interventions."The study found that there weren't any significant differences among
the different physiological measurements for the different conditions.

Title: Music and Your Emotions
Author: Alexander Capurso
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Main Stacks
Call #: ML 3920.M896
128 pages Liveright Publishing Corporation
386 Fourth Avenue ( 1952)
New York 16, N.Y.

This is a clinical guide to music selection associated with desired emotional responses. A large number of ingenious observations have been collected and recorded, in schools, clinics, hospitals, and industrial institutions. The experiments proceeded along two main lines: (1) investigation of the effect music
has on the physiological functions of the human organism, and (2) study of its influence upon the human mind. The book attempts to do three things: 1) to introduce the reader to the broad problems of the relationship of music to emotions; 2) to outline the scientist¹s quest for a suitable approach to the problem;
and 3) to present the results of two major studies designed to relate mood changes to particular stimuli.

Title: The Effects of Music Therapy on Anxiety in Chronically Ill Patients
Author: Jodi-Levine Gross and Roberts Swartz
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library
Music Therapy Journal Vol 2 no.1, 1982 p.43-51

This article explains the areas of high anxiety levels in elderly and chronically ill adults. It explains music¹s effects on various types of anxiety disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine whether participation in music therapy would produce changes in the ³trait² and ³state² anxiety of chronically ill hospitalized patients. The results showed that listening to happy, stimulating music elicited higher levels of anxiety than sad, sedate music and was less likely to reduce ³ state² anxiety. It also showed that exciting music produced more aggression as well as higher levels of anxiety than calm and no music situations.

Title: Music Therapy and Stress Reduction Research
Author: Suzanne B. Hanser
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Journal of Music Therapy, XXII (4), 1985, 193-206

This article recognizes the effects of anxiety and stress on human behavior. This paper attempts to define anxiety, also referred to as stress and tension, and presents 2 models for coping with it. The role of music in palliative and instrumental modes of coping is explored. A review of music therapy and stress
reduction identifies problems in methodology and in the operational definitions of ³relaxing² or ³sedative² music. Different techniques for measuring relaxation are discussed.

Title: Reciprocal Inhibition in Music Therapy: A Case Study Involving Wind Instrument Usage to Attenuate Fear, Anxiety, and Avoidance Reactivity in a Child with Pervasive Development Disorder
Author: Paul D. Hoelzley
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Music Therapy Journal 1991, Vol.10, No.1, 58-76

This article describes how wind instruments were used to reciprocally inhibit the strong fear, anxiety, and avoidance behavior of a 6- year-old girl with pervasive development disorder. Within the context of music therapy intervention, it was hypothesized that if fear-provoking stimuli ( i.e. the wind instruments as
feared objects) occurred simultaneously with fear-inhibiting stimuli ( i.e., the sounds of the wind instruments) the tie linking the instruments to the fear could be weakened or eliminated. This article explains the course of therapy with this child with PDD and the music therapist. During the course of music therapy the client showed considerable improvement in fine motor skills, attention span, and
levels of compliance and frustration tolerance. The article provides background information on PDD, explains the case history, and descibes music therapy assessment.

Title: The Effects of Music and Relaxation on Third Trimester Anxiety in Adolescent Pregnancy
Author: Sammi S. Liebman and Alleen MacLaren
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library- Bound Journals
Journal of Music Therapy, XXVIII (2) 1991, 89-100

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a music and relaxation intervention on anxiety levels with a population of pregnant adolescents. Nineteen girls provided data for the experimental group (those subjects receiving music therapy intervention), while 20 girls provided data for the control group
(those subjects not receiving music therapy intervention). The article describes the procedures, a discussion and the results of the test.

Title: The Effects of Different Types of Relaxation Music on Tension Level
Author: Thomas G. Logan and Allan R. Roberts
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library - Bound Journals
Journal of Music Therapy, XXI (4), 1984, 177-183

This study compared the effects of two different kinds of relaxation music on
tension level during a single 20 minute training session. The purpose of this study
was to compare the effectiveness of different types of relaxation music on subjects¹
momentary tension level.

Title: Comparisons of Cognitive, Music, and Imagery Techniques on Anxiety Reduction with University Students
Author: Lori A. Russell
Location: UWEC-McIntyre Library - Bound Journals
Journal of College Student Development V.33 Jan- Nov. 1992

This article explains the effectiveness of imagery, music, and cognitive therapeutic techniques in the reduction of anxiety. Two questions were asked when they did this study: (1) ³ Which techniques( imagery, music, and a cognitive intervention) were the most effective in lowering anxiety as compared to a control group and to each other?² (2) ³ What were the effects of imagery, music, and a
cognitive intervention on the different types of anxiety ( state and trait)?²

Title: Music Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety and Fear in Terminal Pediatric Patients
Author: Trudy Shulman Fagen
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library
Music Therapy Journal Vol. 2 no.1, 1982 p. 13-23

This article explains how Music Therapy is an effective tool in uncovering and working through fears and anxieties related to death and mourning. The population examined here is the latency age child and early adolescent at the end stage of life- from time of diagnosis of terminal illness to death. Presented are excerpts of case studies that display a variety of music therapy techniques.

Title: Clinical Applications of Music and Chemotherapy: The Effects on Nausea and Emesis
Author: Jayne M. Standly
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Bound Journals
Music Therapy Perspectives 1992 Vol 10 (1) 27-35

This article provides an overview of a summer demonstration program combining music listening with chemotherapy treatment and discusses the results of an exploratory study on the subsequent effects. The side effects of chemotherapy are varied and range in magnitude from minor to traumatic pain, illness, anxiety, and/ or psychological morbidity. It discusses a new clinical application of music therapy: music listening to reduce the side effects of chemotherapy. Data was collected on 15 people who completed
four or more chemotherapy treatments under one of several conditions isolating the influence of music. In conclusion, the patients and staff reacted very favorably to the benefits of music listening during chemotherapy.


Social Skills

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Title: "Stress, relaxation & pleasure"
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: JOURNALS MICROFILM Supervision Jun 1995, v56n6, p. 14-18 (5 pages)

This article states that according to a survey by Harris Research, the main cause of office stress is overwork, with 50% of respondents worldwide claiming to be either too busy or being understaffed. When the world's office workers get home, their preferred ways of unwinding after a stressful day in the office include talking to friends, listening to music, reading, and watching TV. This article reinforces the usefulness of some commonly known stress relievers.


Spiritual Status

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Alvin, Juliette. Music Therapy. New York Basic Books, Inc., P, 1966.
Call number: ML 3920.A66 1975.

The author of this book traced the history of music and ancient beliefs about the healing power of music to the uses of music today in music therapy to the uses of music and trends of it in the future. The author also wrote about the uses of music in healing, the physiological and psychological effects of music on people and in specific contexts, and the practices of music therapy.



Students

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Adaman, J. E. and P. H. Blaney. “The effects of musical mood induction on creativitiy.” Journal of Creative Behavior 29(2) (1995): 95-108.
(Bound) shelved by title.

The researchers in this study used musical mood induction to induce either elated, depressed, or neutral moods in undergraduate college students. The mood was induced by using three twenty-minute musical induction tapes that had been developed and approved by M. F. Pignatiello et al. The tapes related to elated, depressed, and neutral conditions. Familiarity with the music played, the ability to concentrate
during the mood induction, the years of musical training, and the enjoyment of the music presented were all assessed in relation to changes in mood scores. The elated subjects had a significantly higher score than depressed subjects on mood ratings and elated and depressed groups were significantly more creative than the neutral groups.



Treatment

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Title: Comprehensive Stress Management
Edition: 4th ed.
Author: Greenberg, Jerrold S.
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Main Stacks
Call #: BF575.S75 G66 1993
Dubuque, IA. : Brown & Benchmark, c1993.
Description: xvi, 460 p. : ill ; 24 cm.

This is a textbook filled with useful information regarding stress and stress management. The text provides several scales and measurement tools to analyze the levels of stress and anxiety for individuals. The author also went into detail describing possible coping techniques. This information can be useful in understanding the scope and boundaries in treating and managing stress through music therapy.



Priestly, Mary. Music Therapy In Action. New York St. Martin's Press, 1975.
Call number: ML 3920.P88.

The author's purpose in writing this book was to talk about what generally happens in music therapy. This book discusses different techniques in music therapy and presents case studies to help the reader understand music therapy more clearly. It also discusses the benefits of using music therapy when treating
anxiety disorders. Music has a natural calming effect which assists in the treatment of these disorders when nothing else can.

Title: Clinical Applications of Music and Chemotherapy: The Effects on Nausea and Emesis
Author: Jayne M. Standly
Location: UWEC McIntyre Library-Bound Journals
Music Therapy Perspectives 1992 Vol 10 (1) 27-35

This article provides an overview of a summer demonstration program combining music listening with chemotherapy treatment and discusses the results of an exploratory study on the subsequent effects. The side effects of chemotherapy are varied and range in magnitude from minor to traumatic pain, illness, anxiety, and/ or psychological morbidity. It discusses a new clinical application of music therapy: music listening to reduce the side effects of chemotherapy. Data was collected on 15 people who completed
four or more chemotherapy treatments under one of several conditions isolating the influence of music. In conclusion, the patients and staff reacted very favorably to the benefits of music listening during chemotherapy.