A-Z List


Standards Adapted for Hearing Impairments


Improvisation

Rationale:  Indigenous music of every culture was first improvised and then passed on to subsequent generations through aural or “rote” learning.  Improvisation continues to be an important means of self-expression in all cultures and is an integral part of students’ musical heritage.  

Improvisation to develop responses to sound using vibrations needs to be a beginning structure to target all standards.

 

 

 

Creativity:  Composition

 

Rationale:  Composing and arranging music is an important creative activity and a means of personal expression.  The performance of one’s own musical work is a source of great satisfaction as well as an important way of sharing musical inspiration with others. These creative activities are possible at any age, depending upon a person’s level of music skills and knowledge.

The ability of each student to compose will reflect the pace and progress of vocal and instrumental work.  Individual instruction is necessary.

 

                

 

    


Literacy:

 

Rationale:  Much like reading a novel or writing a poem, music notation represents another language or symbolic system of communication.  Unlike the written or spoken word, music and music notation transcend the boundaries of countries and cultures.  Reading and notating music give the students access to a vast body of contemporary and historical music literature, as well as to a unique mode of personal expression.

 The ability of each student to understand these concepts is dependent on the severity of the hearing impairment and progress in musical performance.

by grade 4 by grade 8 by grade 12
Students in general music classes will Students in general music classes will Students in general music classes will
*use standard symbols to notate meter, rhythm, pitch, dynamics in pattern and/or song *read whole, half, quarter, eighth, and dotted notes and rests in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8, 3/8, and alla breve meter signatures *continue to use standards and nontraditional notation to record their musical ideas and the musical ideas of others
identify symbols and traditional terms referring to dynamics, tempo, and articulation, and interpret them correctly when performing use standard notation and non-traditional notation to record their simple musical ideas and the simple musical ideas of others read an instrumental or vocal score of up to four staves
*read whole, half, quarter, eighth, and dotted notes and rests in 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 meter signatures identify and define standard notation symbols for pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, articulation, and expression read and notate chord symbols on harmonic classroom instruments
use a system (syllables, numbers, or letters) to read simple pitch notation in the treble clef in major keys sight-read simple melodies in both the treble and bass clefs  
     

 

by grade 4 by grade 8 by grade 12
Students in instrumental classes will Students in instrumental classes will Students in instrumental classes who have completed one year of study will
read whole, half, quarter, and eighth notes in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4,  meter signatures sight-read simple melodies in the treble and/or bass clefs identify and define standard notation symbols for pitch, rhythm, dynamic, articulation
recognize standard musical symbols of pitch, rhythm, dynamics, and articulation read whole, half, quarter, and eighth notes in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 3/8, and alla breve meter signatures sight-read, accurately and expressively music with a level of difficulty of three, on a scale of one to six
  use standard notation to record their simple musical ideas and the simple musical ideas of others interpret nonstandard notation symbols used by some twentieth century composers
  identify and define standard notation for pitch, rhythm, dynamic, tempo, articulation, and expression  

 

by grade 4 by grade 8 by grade 12
  Students in choral classes will Students in choral classes who have completed one year of study will
  read notation sufficiently to perform simple melodies or rhythms accurately after practice demonstrate the ability to read a vocal score of up to four staves by describing how the elements of music are used.
  use a system (syllables, numbers, or letters) to sight-read simple melodies in both the treble and bass clefs, accurately and expressively, with a level of difficulty of two on a scale of one to six sight-read, accurately and expressively, music with a level of difficulty of three, on a scale of one to six
    interpret nonstandard notation symbols used by some twentieth century composers
    with MORE than one year of study, demonstrate the ability to read a full vocal score by describing how the elements of music are used and explaining all transpositions and clefs.
    with MORE than one year of study, sight-read, accurately and expressively, music with a level of difficulty of four on a scale of one to six.


Our appreciation is expressed to the Office of University Research at the University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire for their funding and support of most of the projects represented in this website.