A-Z List


Bereavement

Journal Articles

Compiled by Heather Evanson - May 9, 2000


Curtis, S. L. (1986). The effect of music therapy on pain relief and relaxation of the terminally ill. Journal of Music Therapy. 23, 1. 10-22.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

The article presents the results from a study which examines how music can effect the terminally ill. The areas it examines include perceived degree of pain relief, physical comfort, relaxation, and contentment. Curtis discusses benefits of music therapy with the terminally ill, including relaxation and reduction of anxiety. The focus of pain management in this article is pain with oncology patients and other patients with terminal illnesses.

Gilbert, J. P. (1977). Music therapy perspective on death and dying. Journal of Music Therapy. 14, 4. 165-171.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

This article discusses the needs of music therapy in the population/setting of death and dying. It first discusses death and dying in general. Issues such as life expectancy, death rates, and longevity are included. Gilbert examines isolation of a seriously ill person from family and friends due to medical technology and equipment. She discusses in detail the characteristics and needs of the dying individual as well as the family. The five stages of death identified by Kubler-Ross are highlighted: denial, anger and resentment, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. Gilbert discusses these stages in detail and relates them to uses of music therapy during death and dying.

O’Callaghan, C. C. (1977). Therapeutic Opportunities associated with the music when using song writing in Palliative Care. Music Therapy Perspectives. 15, 1.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

This article describes the origins of song writing in music, its use in palliative care, and offers distinctions between song writing and poetry writing. Although both writing poetry and writing songs can enable patients to communicate messages and express memories and inner states, the unique impact of music in palliative care is discussed. Ten therapeutic opportunities found to be associated with music when using song writing are suggested.

O’Callaghan, C. C. (1996). Lyrical themes in songs written by Palliative Care patients. Journal of Music Therapy. 33, 2.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

O’Callaghan discusses a study that looks at song writing in palliative care. Lyrical themes are investigated. There were eight themes that emerged in the song writing process. The most common are discussed. Reasons for using song writing in palliative care are also discussed.

Brodsky, W. (1989). Music therapy as an intervention for children with cancer in isolation rooms. Music Therapy. 8, 1.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

The author discusses the effects of hospitalization on individuals. He touches on the three major stages recognized during the course of leukemia. He discusses music therapy for hospitalized medical and oncology patients, as well as its use in isolation rooms. He then talks about four specific cases and how music therapy was used.

Wigram, T. (1995). The psychological and physiological effects of low frequency sound and music. Music Therapy Perspectives. 13, 1.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

This paper examines the psychological and physiological effects of sound by considering a section of the literature that exists on the effect of music on physical conditions such as pain, muscle tone, blood pressure, and heart rate. Specifically, the paper focuses on a method of therapy known as Vibroacoustic Therapy (VA) and summarizes studies that incorporated this system of therapy with clients who had severe physical handicaps, clients with self-injurious behavior, clients who had raised levels of anxiety, and also individuals who are not otherwise in need of treatment. Conclusions from the research literature are offered along with future directions for physical uses of music to influence and help people with specific conditions.

Wolfe, D. E. (?). Pain rehabilitation and music therapy. Journal of Music Therapy. 15, 4. 162-178.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

This paper describes what pain is. The nature of pain may depend on influences other than the central nervous system. Wolfe discusses ways to alleviate pain other than music therapy. He then discusses research done using music therapy to help with pain.

Froehlich, M. A. R. (1984). A comparison of the effect of music therapy and medical play therapy on the verbalization behavior of pediatric patients. Journal of Music Therapy. 21, 1. 2-15.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

This paper examines whether music therapy or medical play therapy is more effective. It discusses the two types of therapies used and the results achieved. Hospitalization is one of the most stressful events, and it may cause anxiety, fear, withdrawal, regression, and defiance. Hospitalization and illness arouse the need for creative expression as a means of coping. Music therapy is employed with hospitalized infants to: soothe and comfort; encourage movement, exploration, and imitation; offer a sense of normalcy to patients and their families; and reduce tension during a patient’s death. It has also helped to facilitate verbalization

West T. M. (1994). Psychological issues in hospice music therapy. Music Therapy Perspectives. 12, 2.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

Survivors of trauma often have difficulty with assertiveness and anger management. This paper describes an improvisational technique using drumming and cognitive-behavioral methods to address issues of power in an experiential and symbolic manner. This drumming technique was developed in an inpatient short-term psychiatric setting with adults and adolescents who had a history of physical, sexual, or emotional abuse. Many different cases are presented, and this technique is described in detail.

Wylie, M. E., & Blom, R. (1986). Guided imagery and music with hospice patients. Music Therapy Perspectives. 3.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

The purpose of this article is to describe the music, relaxation process, guided imagery, and patient responses to imagery used with hospice patients. Individual case studies with two hospice patients used a variety of music as well as guided imagery to help facilitate pain control and help patients reminisce about their lives. This article reported that patients felt creative, safe, and secure. This article also presents descriptions of how imagery and music were adapted to the needs of each patient.

Curtis, S. L. (1986). The effect of music on pain relief and relaxation of the terminally ill. Journal of Music Therpay. 23, 1. 10-24.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

Pain may be perceived in many different ways. This article talks about pain in the psychological sense. Anticipation of pain is one of many emotional states that the terminally ill experience. Since music can elicit both physiological and psychological responses, it can be helpful in both alleviating pain and reducing the anxiety that goes along with the expectation of pain. Music may be used as a pain suppressor, a distracter, and a relaxation agent.

Fagan, T. S. (1982). Music therapy in the treatment of anxiety and fear in terminally pediatric patients. Music Therapy. 2, 1.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

This article states that music therapy is an effective tool in uncovering and working through fears and anxieties related to death and mourning. It discusses the applicability of music therapy in helping with issues of fear and anxiety in terminally ill children. Children do not perceive death in the same way that most adults do. Music therapy can help children to release unresolved grief and anticipatory mourning.

Bailey, L. M. (1984). The use of songs in music therapy with cancer patients and their families. Music Therapy. 4, 1. 5-17.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

This article discusses feelings of cancer patients. These feelings may include isolation, depression, tension, loss, grief, and pain. Music therapy can provide support and serves as a tool for change with cancer patients and their families. Goals and stages in music therapy for cancer patients are discussed. The three stages include contact, awareness and resolution. Songs chosen may be used to represent one or more of nine themes described in this article.

Schiller, A. (1982). From the editor. Music Therapy. 2, 1.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

The editor discusses music therapy. She discusses the different articles in the journal. She says that the process is demanding, painstaking, but ultimately rewarding. The perspectives that she discusses include such things as anxiety in the terminally ill pediatric patient, anxiety in chronically ill adults, and treatment of echolalia.

Short, A. E. (1992). Music and imagery with physical disabled elderly resident: A GIM adaptation. Music Therapy. 11, 1. 65-98.
Call #: CD-ROM 50055 - UWEC: McIntyre Library (Reserve).

This article outlines a music and imagery program with physically disabled elderly residents. GIM is the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music. This article describes adaptations for using GIM in the group setting. Charts are given to demonstrate how this was done. There were adaptations made for different disabilities. Bereavement is mentioned as a serious psychological stressor for the elderly person. In the current study there were indications that issues of bereavement might form an important focus for the music and imagery program. The aging process was also referenced.