The I's Have It:
New Media Strengths and Challenges for 21st Century Journalism Students

Interactivity

Requires new media journalists to:
  • See all sides of a story
  • Tell nonfiction stories in a nonlinear fashion. Example
  • Remain open to critiques from users and responsive to their needs/requests
  • Be able to "chat" live online -- in writing, audio or video -- like a talk-show host or guest does now on broadcast. Example
  • Start and carry along asynchronous discussions on issues they report on. Example
  • Monitor Web sites and online discussions for tips on their beats
  • Be able to help plan, implement and effectively use generation after generation of new software, hardware, site designs, routines, bosses and co-workers. Example

In-depth

Requires new media journalists to:
  • Develop the greater expertise, tenacity and time needed to write in-depth stories. Example
  • See all kinds of stories, not just those dictated by our current space-and-time driven "media logic." Example
  • Develop stories from -- and new sites for -- under-covered communities, such as homemakers, non-English speakers and other niche readerships/markets. Example
  • Marry written words with still pictures, audio and video. Example

International

Requires new media journalists to:
  • Think globally (and spur people to act locally, as civic journalism moves online). Example
  • Be able to write and speak more than one language. Example
  • Have greater knowledge of geography, in the liberal arts sense, including knowing other nations' politics.
  • Be able to work around the clock, because there's a "deadline every minute" online and it's always "prime time" somewhere in the world. Example

Immediate

Requires new media journalists to:
  • Do everything faster
  • Have the stamina to continually work under tight deadline pressure
  • Be good at solving problems imposed by technology, time and distance
  • Have a strong ethical foundation and skills at applying classical ethics theories to contemporary online journalism practices. Online Ethics, a Poynter Institute presentation