Hypotheses

I derived these hypotheses from my literature review. Of the 14 hypotheses, nine were supported by the data I collected at .05 significance or better. These nine hypotheses are marked with a double asterisk (**). Several of them are hyperlinked to graphs.

H1:** Most of the study's subjects will spend most of their online time using hegemonic Web pages. (Graph available.)

H2:** The longer they use an online page or message, the higher they'll rate it.

H3: Online hegemony usage will be higher the less time they spend on e-mail each week, the less time they spend in chat groups and if don't have a personal home page.

H4: Online hegemony usage will be higher the more time they spend on the Web each week, the higher their ratio of Web usage to e-mail usage and if they make online purchases.

H5: Online hegemony usage will be higher the longer they've been using the Web.

H6: Online hegemony usage will be higher if they have their own home page and their home page has no chats but does have ads or commercial credits.

H7:** Online hegemony usage will be higher if they do not list a counterhegemonic Web page as their favorite.

H8:** Online counterhegemony usage will be higher if they are nonwhite. (Graph available.)

H9: Online hegemony usage will be higher if they come from higher income households.

H10:** Online hegemony usage will be higher the higher their level of education.

H11:** Online hegemony usage will be higher the older they are.

H12:** Online hegemony usage will be higher among men than women. (Graph available.)

H13:** Online hegemony usage will be higher the more they rate toward the masculine end of the gender scale. (Graph available.)

H14:** Online hegemony usage will be higher the lower they rate on the alienation scale. (Graph available.)

** = significant at alpha .05

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