1880s - 1890s

 Queen Anne

2 - 3.5 stories
The Queen Anne is the most elaborate of all 19th century house styles. It reflects the eclecticism of the late 19th century. Queen Anne houses are very vertical, which is evident in their 2.5 to 3.5 stories.

queen anne stucco.jpg (61166 bytes)
stucco version,
Third Ward


narrow clapboard,
Third Ward

queen anne sie view.jpg (46172 bytes)
bay widnow,
Third Ward

queen ann3-3rd ward.jpg (33213 bytes)
narrow clapboard,
Third Ward

Here are other versions of this style:
ec13.gif (139363 bytes) This is good example of a Queen Anne house. It has several porches and gabled roofs for decoration. It also shows the elaborate corbelling on the large chimneys.
ec10.gif (148363 bytes)
This house shows the concept of wooden relief decorations in the gabled ends very nicely. It also stresses the idea of large elaborate porches.
queen art brick.jpg (39357 bytes) This is a prime example of  a very elaborate Queen Anne style.  It is very vertical with 3.5 stories.  It also has numerous balconies and porches that are emphasized with arches and pillars. Stained glass decorates the living and dining areas and vertical windows are placed in all rooms.  It has numerous massive chimneys decorated with elaborate corbelling.  The roof has many steep gables decorated with wooden fish scale shingles.  This house sits on a massive cutstone foundation, commonly for all 19th century houses.
ec51.gif (144192 bytes) Can you date this house? Is this from the 1880s-1890s or much later? This house was in fact built in the 1980s which is evident by the absence of a massive cutstone foundation. This house is poured concrete basement.

Queen Anne houses have distinctive features that set them apart from other styles:
steep gabled roofs decorated with half timbering or wooden relief decorations in the gable ends.  
huge corbelled chimneys
numerous balconies
vertical windows
stained-glass windows
large porches
are numerous and important
massive cutstone foundations

Created by Jason Dettman on 6 June 1997; last revised on 5 June 2002.