1930-1960s

  International 

1 story

This style is based on "modern" structural principles and materials: concrete, glass, and steel.  Bands of glass, which create horizontal feelings, are important design features. Buildings are cantilevered over basement footings. Artificial symmetry and decorations are avoided: balance and regularity is stressed. All International style houses are just one story but it is possible to apply the style to a two story building, especially if if is hidden from view, as in this example along Putnam Park. This photos shows several expensive features. Can you find them?

Answers: hand-cut field stones, skylights, an elevated mound in the front yard, and a driveway feature!

The style was started in Western Europe during the 1920s by Walter Gropius and Ludwig Mies von der Rohe, both architects of the Bauhaus School. The International style is one of only two house types with flat roofs -- Art Deco is the other flat-roofed style.

int'l style offices.JPG (53630 bytes) The International style was commonly used for commercial buildings from the 1940s to the 1960s. This style appeared first in large metropolitan centers and gradually was accepted in smaller cities, as this 1960s example of a medical center in Eau Claire.

Most International houses have these features:
flat roof
horizontal,  "boxy" look
cantilevered rooms over the basement
corner placed casement windows
poured concrete basement

Created by Jake Schlueter, June 10th,  1997; last revised on 5 June 2002.